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  • All fields: civilization
(25 results)



Display: 20

    • 1930_all 5

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    • EI.MFR G. PETERSON President ANTHONY \Y. 1V1NS President of Hoard WALTER K. GRANGER Chairman ii. A. C. Committee OFFICIALS T HAVE felt that the students from the Branch College have the opportunity to provide more than their share of the leadership...
    • Page 11

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    • P R E S I D E N T As I look back over the twenty-six years I have been privileged to be associated with the Branch College, I have a flood of memories of what sometimes seemed slow but in perspective was sure and inevitable development from a high...
    • Page 470

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    • was named "Little Muddy" from i t s muddy appearance. Eighteen miles north of this place i s Center Creek where over one-half of the Company remained, while the other half journeyed south, under the direction of Parley P. Pratt. Here it was, on a...
    • Page 490

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    • apostles saw i t , was not so much the smelting of iron, vital though this was to the pioneer economy, b u t , more importantly, the building of a harmonious and unified community here on the borders of civilization. This was to be done in spite of...
    • Page 225

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    • two or more weeks. President Young finally realiied that neither war nor peace would stop the threat of federal control of Utah. The Saints accepted the Presidential proclamation of Arnnesty and agreed to exchange their promise of loyalty for the...
    • Page 320

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    • interested in the accumulation of weaith than thev were in living their religion. People were fighting among themselves, until it became so senous that the entire Church records were taken across the Colorado River to keep them safe. President...
    • Page 382

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    • weli in spite of the drought in Pacheco. They probably were able to irrigate their crops; and, being at a much lower elevation, nothing would have ftozen.] When we were rnaking preparations for our retum home, the team had to be shod. Alma...
    • Page 479

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    • Jane's mother, brother and sister, leaving her alone with her father, who remanied three years later. Being the oldest child, she was her father's chef dependence for help and spent much of her time in the field doing a man's work. In 1863 she...
    • Page 84

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    • three-quarters of a mile of road from the plateau west of the Colorado down to the river through the Hole-in-the-Rock, and because of the difficulties experienced at that point the whole trek is called "The Hole-inthe-Rock Expedition." The story of...
    • Page 10

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 11 Cultural Myths and Their Relation to Teaching Civilization Origins – Egyptian C.S. Littleton explains in minute detail the histories of numerous mythologies in his work Mythology (2002). During the most...
    • Page 13

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 14 from toxins in the sarcophagus to poisonous bat droppings. This is another excellent way to engage students in mythology. Though the lesson is geared for 3rd through 5th graders, it can easily be modified...
    • Page 14

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 15 Gilgamesh’s hero epic is extremely relevant to teach to modern day students as it is the first known written epic for our world. Just viewing the cuneiform tablets can impress upon students how difficult it...
    • Page 15

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 16 have already heard of characters from these two mythologies. They may have heard of Cupid, Hercules, or Poseidon (to name a few possibilities). Furthermore, words and symbols from these mythologies are...
    • Page 16

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 17 Badb, Macha, and Queen Maeve were also prominent feminist figures in the stories of the Celtic people. For a king to have success as a ruler, he must “marry” one of the goddesses in a divine ritual. In this...
    • Page 17

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 18 called Ragnarok, which was to be the end of the world. Their mythology laid out precisely what would happen in the human realm (Midgard), to the gods in Asgard, and in the underworld (Niflheim/Hel) at the...
    • Page 18

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 19 that have been collected in past lives, and how they will positively or negatively affect the life to come. Therefore if an individual was sinful or negligent in his past lives, he could expect to return in...
    • Page 20

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 21 Civilization Origins – Eastern: Japanese One of the most interesting differentiations that sets Japanese myth apart from that of other myths is that the creation of earth came from Amaterasu, a woman. Many...
    • Page 21

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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 22 square of land which it is upon. Students can practice their debate skills as they argue for which type of society would be best. In this way, Native American myth can be tied directly to both political...

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