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  • All fields: child
(713 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 18

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    • 14 Where parents are capable of guiding the child and are inclined to supervise the home study, their children succeed in school. But where the parents are illiterate or for other reasons are unable to supervise the home study, their children as...
    • Page 42

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 38 Table 5 Mean Response to Student Outcome Statements 3 and 12 Survey Item Mean Response Out of 6.0 #3 RTI has resulted in a proactive system that better meets the needs of all students. 5 #12 RTI has...
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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 23 Figure 2 (photograph taken from http://www.telegraph.co.uk) In a photograph entitled, “Accidental Napalm” (figure 2) the Hariman and Lucaites attempt to analyze the moral capacity that the photograph may have on a viewer. They...
    • Page 8

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    • 4 Students involved with bus transportation were generally eliminated (after conferencing with these students and parents) from club invitations due to the inability to arrive at school at the prescribed time. While one parent did offer to drive a...
    • Page 121

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    • 114 Appendix B Parent/guardian letter of approval A letter was sent to the parent/guardian of Mrs. Okeson’s algebra I students on March 2, 2010. Contact information was given if the adult did not want their child participating in the creative...
    • Page 122

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    • 115 March 2, 2010 Dear Parents, Your child is being invited to take part in a research study to encourage an interest in mathematics. The study will include real life math problems integrating Howard Gardner’s multiple intelligences. For...
    • Page 44

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 40 Chapter 5 Discussion Mandates, like NCLB (2002) and IDEIA (2004), include high expectations for student proficiency, quality instruction, and research-based strategies which address achievement...
    • Page 125

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    • No pirates no princesses 120 and my child has been blessed and gifted with the ability to sing beautifully and she now attends the Orange County High School of the Arts in the music and theatre company. My step daughter J is 19 and she is my...
    • Page 123

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    • 116 Your child’s information will be combined with information from others taking part in the project. When I report the results of the study with others, I will write about the combined information. Your child will never be identified in any way...
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    • 6 Chapter 2 Literature Review When attempting to close the academic achievement gap between English language learners (ELLs) and native English speakers, it is necessary to examine interventions that have proven effective. The researcher has...
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    • 23 Regardless of reports that homework may or may not increase academic achievement, elementary students are spending increasing amounts of time studying outside the classroom. In a longitudinal study from 1981 to 1997, Hofferth & Sandberg (2001)...
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    • NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION IN INSTANT MESSAGING 23 professionals and others have used drawing techniques with children that are not specifically designed to assess, diagnose, or evaluate the child, but to provide a way for the child to communicate...
    • Page 24

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    • 20 is the firm belief that parental engagement makes a significant difference to educational outcomes and that parents have a key role to play in raising educational standards. In summary, the more engaged parents are in the education of their...
    • Page 23

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    • NON-VERBAL COMMUNICATION IN INSTANT MESSAGING 24 activities are capable of generating important information from children with cancer: (a) free drawings (drawings with no directive given by the therapist), especially when children reflect their...
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    • 21 Teachers face many barriers: time, accessibility of the parents, and the ineffective outcome of previous parent teacher encounters. However, there are valid reasons why parents slip in consistent communication with schools, and teachers. The...
    • Page 30

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    • 25 their primary language (L1) as well as their second language (L2). When children are able to read in both L1 and L2, they develop language skills in their L1, find it easier to read in English, and learn to read or improve reading skills in both...
    • Page 13

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    • 9 Prater and Turner (2002) have suggested that the predicament of a being reluctant reader is admittedly hard to pin down. The reasons for students’ reluctance to read widely differ. Sometimes reluctance can be rooted in reading difficulties, but...
    • 1955_001 32

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    • CEDAR CITY, UTAH 27 DIVISION OF HOME AND FAMILY LIVING ETHELYN 0. GREAVES, U.S.A.C., Dean, School of Home and Family Living LANICE MooRE, Chairman Child Development and Parental Education, Foods and Nutrition, Textiles and Clothing. DIVISION OF...
    • Page 26

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    • 22 A common interpretation of the link between low parental knowledge and child/adolescent problem behavior is that parents, by actively monitoring the nature of their adolescents’ activities and companions, are better able to intervene, which in...
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    • Emotions in Conflict 1 Chapter One Introduction Interpersonal relationships are a fundamental part of the human experience. Throughout a typical day, it is common for an individual to have numerous interactions with other people. Each interaction...

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