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    • Page 14

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    • more diverse audience. 78% agree that digital technologies encourage creativity. 79% agree that digital technologies encourage collaboration amongst students. These teachers view cell phones, social networks and texting as a way to aid student...
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    • Chapter 1 Introduction Context of the Problem In 1991 Minnesota passed the nation’s first charter school law, followed by several more states, including California, Michigan, Arizona, and Massachusetts (Manno, 2004). This charter school movement...
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    • 3 how do assessments impact the parent/teacher perception of charter schools; and three, do teachers use scores from state-mandated assessments evaluate their own performance/success? Research Questions The following questions helped guide the...
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    • 39 Figure 11. Parent comparison of item 1: Academic performance is the most important element of a public charter school. In Figure 11, a majority of parents agreed that academic performance is the most important element of a public charter school;...
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    • 53 communities would be better served by an evaluation that contained additional information in addition to student scores that was better aligned with both mission and community expectation. Finally, there is a call for more research on the public...
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    • 60 students a broader knowledge base about the many ways to utilize what is around them. The students were not graded by comparing them to norms or to one another. Students’ scores increased according to their abilities and physical progress....
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    • DAVID’S VS. GOLIATH 14 There is not a deficiency in Fortune 500 PR companies, but recently there has been a boom in small PR “boutiques” (p. 139). Prosek argues “we and other small firms such as ours have a unique advantage—something our sizeable...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 24 when they see their peers mastering the skills and knowledge they are lacking. In this stage children learn to juggle demands not only from school but also from home, friends, and extracurricular activities. If...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 113 about the program. Additionally, Ross et al.’s study may have been affected by a positive bias towards TLIM program since FranklinCovey funded it. While the adults in this study did not view TLIM program...
    • Page 142

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 135 Lapsley, D., & Power, F. (2005). Orienting themes and issues. In D. Lapsley & F. Power (Eds.), Character psychology and character education, (pp. 1-17). Notre Dame, IN: Notre Dame University Press. Lickona, T....

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