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Display: 20

    • Page 5

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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Due to the various benefits of inclusion, many school systems today are moving toward inclusion, or integrating students with disabilities into the regular education setting (Perles, 2010; Vaughn, 2007). Pupils with disabilit...
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    • 1 Chapter I Introduction Will a nurturing pedagogy lead to greater access to knowledge for students? Are there limitations to a nurturing pedagogy that can end up being a barrier to gaining knowledge? What is a nurturing pedagogy and how do...
    • Page 13

    • Autism; Education; Educational psychology
    • 10 provided adequate support and encouragement for her to be socially included in the classroom” (Mayton, 2005, p94). Although the young girl felt accepted by the teacher she did not feel completely accepted by other students in her class; the...
    • Page 17

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    • 11 p. 63). These strategies are all metacognitive skills. Self-reflection occurs as the student uses the assessment to figure out how s/he is doing, where they could do better, and what they need to do differently to be more successful (McDonald,...
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    • ! 11! classroom of cooperation. A classroom that seeks “higher order achievement and overall development” requires three conditions: learning that is challenging, curriculum that is attentive to social, ethical and cognitive development, and a...
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    • 13 Gardening Association (Blair, 2009). School gardens surged particularly in urban school districts because researchers found that “non-White students from financially unstable backgrounds who [were] not regularly exposed to open green spaces and...
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    • 15 diversity for the sake of diversity becomes the goal—not higher graduation rates, safer or less stressful learning environments, or subsequent future success. In as far as public policy is concerned, diversity alone has become a sufficient...
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    • 19 in response to media consumption are all illustrative of emotional affective effects. Decreased morale and alienation can occur in response to media dependency as well, or individuals can gain a sense of collective well-being and belonging from...
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    • 19 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING specific eligibility requirements, students are “falling through the cracks”. Researchers believe that the real world is not divided into “regular” and “special,” and therefore, the dual system of special education a...
    • Page 19

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    • 19 monitoring discussions and decision-making process for students within the response to intervention and instruction model” (Mahoney, 2015, p. 125). Summary The existing literature shows a clearly defined link between attendance and...
    • Page 20

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    • 21 of their relationships. They attend to this sense of belonging by monitoring friends’ activities frequently, even obsessively” (p. 355). Each small bit of information that teens gather from social media combines to have a significant influence...
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    • 22 U.S. TV SHOW’ INFLUENCE IN CHINA complaining about their president or government in websites, newspapers, radios or other media, and they do not believe that their leaders are always absolutely right. It is difficult to find the same situation...
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    • 22 were sent home to needy families (Johnnston, 2001). The school community improved with school gardens as documented in a 2001 study by L. Thorp and C. Townsend. This study found that a school garden “reshaped school culture, creating hope,...
    • Page 41

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    • 41 the students know I listened to what they told me and cared about them outside of school. Other things included welcoming them back to class after absence and asking about the reason for the absent. Students informed me that most teachers act...
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    • 56 otherwise, the whole premise is nonsensical. After all, if all individuals or groups of individuals within American society are equally American then at what point does one “culture” end and the other begin? The practical effect of...
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    • 6 task is challenging and meaningful to the student there is a much higher level of behavioral engagement (Stephens, 2015). In-class behaviors that indicate student engagement could be, eye contact, appropriate facial expressions, taking notes,...
    • Page 67

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    • 63 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Repeat directions EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE Alter the environment Target and change behavior Promote academic and social factors that enhance learning Provide successful experiences Provide ample opportunities for...
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    • 66 The minutes recoded on reading logs were indicative of commitment to reading during the project. S3, despite having 100% attendance to book club meetings, was the sole student not meeting the school goal of at least 600 minutes of monthly...
    • Page 72

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    • 68 U.S. TV SHOW’ INFLUENCE IN CHINA looking for media outlets in order to fulfill his/her certain needs (Blumler & Katz, 1974). In other words, audiences actively seek out and target specific media that will provide them with gratification. In...
    • Page 75

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    • 71 the time to talk about books, let imaginations wander, and discuss literature “what ifs” with the project students. As an educator, this project has reminded me why I wanted to become a teacher in the first place—my love of books and my desire...

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