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Display: 20

    • Page 14

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    • 1 1 the newspaper ran the letters exactly as they had been written. It didn't take long to figure out why. For starters, the 25 students spelled "vandal" in nearly as many ways. "Dear Vandales" went one letter, "I really think that you were tuped...
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    • 1 5 the struggling speller. The differentiation is also seen in the practice activities, games and assessments. This program has developed a five-day scope and sequence to help students improve their spelling skills everyday. On day one, the...
    • Page 17

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    • 10 discovered that the books may be for children on one level, but on other levels they speak to older students and adults” (Spicer, 2003, p. 5). According to Furner, Yahya, and Duffy (2005) there are benefits of using literature...
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    • 11 class discussion, they still preferred a lecture format. These researchers suggest that students still believe more knowledge will be gained by the “sage” presenting information than through other, peer-collaborative, activities. If teachers...
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    • 14 requires activities designed to build the personal strengths and creative talents of individuals and thus create human resources necessary for organizational productivity” (Smith & Kritsonis, 2006, p. 2); and most importantly, “the teacher...
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    • 14 the school by using funds from the Effective Teaching and Learning Literacy Program (USDOE, 2010a). These government programs are examples of how educators and scholars are redefining literacy as the term expands into the experiences and lives...
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    • 16 discussions,” para. 2). In addition to student satisfaction, instructors noted the pleasure of hearing the ideas—many of which are “surprisingly compelling”—of the more introverted class members (2003). This format can also decrease...
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    • !16 into play. Convergence is a strategy in which the participant of a conversation elects to adapt his/her communication behaviors to the opposite person or group with which this person is engaged for the purpose of alleviating social differences...
    • Page 23

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    • 18 material, oral and silent reading, monitoring, and wide and repeated reading (Reutzel & Cooter, 2007). Fluency is often measured by the number of words read per minute. There are many assessments to measure fluency, but one of the best known is...
    • Page 23

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    • 19 concept addresses conservation of energy in chemical interactions. It does not address the concept of increase in disorder. This is a concept missing from the Utah Core and will be discussed later in the literature review. This standard is...
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    • 19 following the exercise. The researchers for this experiment suggested that physical activity might increase students’ cognitive control and ability to pay attention. The study was conducted by alternating 20-­‐minute periods of resting or wal...
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    • 2 2 According to Bear, et al. (2004), this word study program “evolves from three decades of research in developmental aspects of word knowledge with children and adults” (p. 5). This research has shown specific patterns of errors that children...
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    • 2 A digital forensics expert is a unique job. This is because not only does the expert need to know about computers and other technologies but needs to understand laws that pertain to computer or cyber crime. An expert also needs to be a good...
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    • !20 understand meaning rather than actual words, which were sometimes difficult to comprehend. One criticism of CAT that must be taken into account is the seemingly subjective nature of communication. This means that there is the potential, in...
    • Page 27

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    • 21 there is a possibility that someone else in the home is (Haneda, 2006). ELL out-of-school “literacy practices are typically bilingual or multilingual in nature” (Haneda, 2006, p. 339), as they are associated with religion and parental...
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    • 22 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design the entire web page; it is also useful in helping understand the images placed thereon. According to C. Forceville (1999): Pictures, including multimodal ‘texts,’ give significant information through the...
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    • 22 students’ investment in school learning appears to increase” (Haneda, 2006, p. 343). ELLs can then feel safe to learn in this type of school environment as it allows them become active readers and writers when exposed to new texts. It is not...
    • Page 29

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    • 23 of the school, McLaughlin noticed that other Western-based institutions, such as the local Christian churches, provided religious reading material in Navajo and that Navajo literacy classes were established by members of the community. In terms...
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    • 25 Anonymous student test scores are public information and were obtained from the Utah State Office of Education’s COGNOS site. Teacher’s individual identification numbers were released to the primary investigator on signed consent...
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    • 25 As required by the Southern Utah University Department of Graduate Studies in Education, all necessary Institutional Review Board (IRB) requirements were met throughout the conduct of this research study. Furthermore, additional requirements of...

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