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Display: 20

    • Page 31

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    • 25 considered more popular modes of receiving printed messages. If educators understand this multimedia culture, and how students in the digital era interpret messages, they can use this knowledge to build on students’ current interests and...
    • Page 7

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    • advocating Contrast Loading believe that the neural adaptations to this type of training will result in greater power output. Variations of the method have been shown to enhance power in well trained athletes (Baker 2001). Dynamic weight training...
    • Page 70

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    • Commitment 65 Another unexpected finding was that planning for the future was a theme found in all of the interviews with the participants concerning communicating commitment. Participants communicated their commitment to their spouse by talking...
    • Page 27

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    • PREFERENCES FOR GROUP LEADERSHIP STYLE 28 Chapter III Rationale, Research Questions and Hypotheses Overall, research suggests that group communication and leadership styles have been investigated rather thoroughly. The domains of individuals have...
    • Page 96

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    • Appendix E is the Southern Utah University Policy 6.8.2. The hard copy of this policy should not change, as policy revisions usually do not change more than once every five years. This means the paper copy found in the hard copy of the manual...
    • Page 33

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    • 27 that curriculum standards are taught and students are prepared for end-of-level tests, such as the CRTs. However, if educators recognize that another priority of teaching should be to learn about the HLEs, home communities, and the cultural...
    • Page 83

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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 79 Sarah shared almost the same situation, but with a very different opinion of how doctors may view it: Sometimes, yeah, we make mistakes. They’ll come up to us and say, “Hey, you scheduled a patient in the schedule at the...
    • Page 37

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    • 33 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING CHAPTER 4 Results The purpose of this project was to design, develop, and deliver an in-­‐school training presentation to the teaching staff at Monroe Elementary School in Sevier School District. In order to complete...
    • Page 82

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 75 “Please share any additional thoughts/comments about using the ‘Leader in Me’ program in your classroom/school.”—yielded responses from the teachers and the principal that, upon analysis, centered on specific...
    • Page 74

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    • Commitment 69 Limitations Although this research study was able to produce rich data and answer the research questions, it also had its own set of limitations. It may be perceived that the demographic for this research study presents a major...
    • Page 40

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    • 36 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Table 2 Regular Classroom Results Yes No % % Are accommodations being made? 37 63 Are students’ needs being met? 20 80 Are disabled students being included? 83 17 Note. Percentage data were rounded to the nearest...
    • Page 65

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    • 59 themselves to reach new goals. For example, if a student had asthma was prone to an attack when running, she ran with her inhaler and she stopped when she needed. Some of these asthma students had never tried running more than a few yards...
    • Page 18

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    • Employee Giving 19 because of the demanding nature of their job. The tactic of “it is not how much you give, but that you give something” worked with that particular steering committee member and provided me with optimism that the overall campaign...
    • Page 41

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    • 37 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Figure 1. Educators’ responses to inclusion Training was presented according to the areas teachers would like more training in. The training included: • Definitions of inclusion • The law regarding inclusion •...
    • Page 66

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    • 60 students a broader knowledge base about the many ways to utilize what is around them. The students were not graded by comparing them to norms or to one another. Students’ scores increased according to their abilities and physical progress....
    • Page 77

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    • Emotions in Conflict 72 emotions. The conclusion was made that these positive emotions generally lead to positive conflict outcomes. While the notion that teachers feel affiliated when parents are working with them to resolve concerns is valuable,...
    • Page 42

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    • 38 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING The training evaluation was given to each teacher at the conclusion of the training. The evaluation showed that 100% of the teachers agreed that their knowledge of inclusion increased as they attended the training....
    • Page 10

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    • TIMELINE PROJECT 11 norms of the audience (Barnhart, 1994). Carrying out this performances is often unconscious, and undertaken no matter the mental state or confidence of the performer. Reasons for enacting this performance can range from actively...
    • Preface - Page ix

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    • PREFACE Through researching and writing the following history of the Mayors of Cedar City, we have gained a greater insight into the problems confronting our city and county leaders. W have also gained a deep appreciation for the tremendous e...
    • Page 41

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    • 35 Table 2 Home Visit Comparison Chart High-Literate ELL Home Visits Low-Literate ELL Home Visits All families were nuclear. There were more single-parent families than nuclear families. At least one parent spoke both English and Spanish...

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