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    • Zion National Park, Russell, Orville

    • Zion National Park (Utah)
    • Orville Russell, resident of Rockville (Utah), dishwasher at Wylie Camp dining room and kitchen. Orville and J.L. Crawford worked together at the old Wylie kitchen and dining room waiting tables and doing all other duties around the kitchen. The...
    • Page 3

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 3 Acknowledgements I would like to thank everyone who helped on this project. First of all, many thanks to Art Challis and Matt Barton for their help on the project. I appreciate their patience and support as I...
    • Page 5

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 5 Introduction: As a professional writer, nothing bothers me more than having practically everyone I meet tell me that they want to write a best-selling novel. They make it sound like all they have to do is sit down...
    • Page 6

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 6 emotion and dialogue to pitching to an agent, what a writer needs to know about self-publishing, designing a novel cover and how to write a great first page. Those people who teach these classes go through the...
    • Page 7

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 7 hero or protagonist to accomplish. It is usually asked as a question. For example, will Sheba find her namesakes mythical kingdom. The second component is the Story Stakes which explains why the story is...
    • Page 8

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 8 Suspense and Conflict: One of the most important themes is conflict and suspense. Conflict builds suspense. Tension and suspense are the same thing. Amy Deardon in her book, How to Develop Story Tension discusses...
    • Page 10

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 10 the writer made in the very first scene and how if that doesn’t happen then the writer will lose the reader who probably won’t buy another book from that writer. She talks about the ‘very last scene, last...
    • Page 11

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 11 to illustrate his points. He also uses movies that weren’t the success that the producers hoped for to illustrate what happens when ‘Saving the Cat’ isn’t used. The example he used were the two Laura Croft...
    • Page 12

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 12 Story Structure: Larry Brooks’ book Story Engineering covers in some detail all the elements of writing. He says that “neither a killer idea nor a Shakespearean flair for words will get you published without a...
    • Page 15

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 15 However, in this Capstone Project, grounded theory is being used for two things: 1. To find the information necessary to produce the script and create PowerPoint slides for teaching the different topics to...
    • Page 20

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 20 Step 4: Additional information. This might not be necessary, but can be added if needed. Lesson 4 This lesson discusses the colors and fonts that work best for a PowerPoint Presentation. Color and text must have...
    • Page 21

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 21 Lesson 6 Lesson six discusses using photos and Images. The presenter must be careful to use only pictures from Creative Commons licenses. There are a number of royalty-free images on the morguefile.com and...
    • Page 23

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 23 crashing down on the hero easier to write. If the writer knows what the mid-point scene is, he can build each scene from the beginning to the mid-point. If the writer know what death and despair scene is—this is...
    • Page 24

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 24 However, as I worked with Art and Matt, my vision began to expand. All the books I read and coded helped me, both as a professional writer, and as a teacher. I began to better understand nebulous concepts like...
    • Page 27

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 27 Appendix One Script—Core Concepts—1 hour Slide 1—title—taken from Story Engineering—Mastering the 6 Core Competencies of Successful Writing by Larry Brooks Slide 2—Core competency #1--Concept Slide 3--Concept...
    • Page 29

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 29 There are two rules for Box 4. Hero needs to be heroic—no one else can resolve the story or the author has failed the reader. Hero can perish, but must resolve the major elements of the story before he does Slide...
    • Page 30

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 30 Slide 36—Putting it all together The only way to become a great writer is to write, have someone (not your spouse or your best friend) critique your writing and then rewrite. Slide 1 Slide 2
    • Page 43

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 43 upside down version, the antithesis. These worlds are so distinct that stepping into Act two must be definite. The hero must choose to leave the old world and step into the new one—he is being proactive. This...
    • Page 44

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 44 out that last, best idea that will save himself and everyone around him. But at the moment, that idea is nowhere in sight. We must be beaten and know it to get the lesson. Break into Three (85)—thanks to what...
    • Page 25

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 21 While more needs to be done to understand and evaluate bilingual students’ writing in both languages, this research should provide teachers of these students with enough insight not to compare their bilingual students’ abilities in either...

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