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  • All fields: administrators
(128 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 105

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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 101 complete self-image has potential to crumble from the outside in as they come to understand the truth. Ergo, how receptionists believe patients feel fits into some degree of either being right or being wrong, but the full...
    • Page 108

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    • RECEPTION PERCEPTION 104 healthcare: benefits for receptionists, benefits for patients, and benefits for doctors. The benefits discussed hereafter are broad reaching and general, however it does give universal appeal to the course of study that...
    • Page 11

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    • Fishback Intern 12 Here, the attempt is to exercise as much control as possible even if the factor controlled has little input, undetermined input, or no input at all into influencing outcomes. Bed checks, uniformity of dress, ‗mustache‘ rules all...
    • Page 11

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 4 Delimitations There were many fruitful lines of inquiry that this study did not address. Most notably, this was not a study of the impact that participant perceptions can have on the effective implementation of...
    • Page 117

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 110 understanding of TLIM program over time. The likely cause for this was the passage of time during which more formal and informal training on TLIM program has taken place school-wide. Question 3. Two adults...
    • Page 118

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 111 the link between character education and academic achievement (cf., Chapter 2, pp. 33-34). Ultimately, the small population size of this study compromised the transferability of these results beyond this case...
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    • Physician & Patient Communication 13 of learning the basic science of communication?” (p. 189). With such training, medical students will communicate better with patients, other physicians and hospital administrators (Arnold, 2003, p. 189). Arnold...
    • Page 12

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    • 8 districts require elementary schools to provide regular physical activity breaks (Lee, Burgeson, Fulton & Spain). It is a school’s job to promote physical activity and provide students with movement opportunities on a daily basis. Physical activity...
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    • 10 fueled considerable anxiety around school board members and administrators, many of who had farm or small town backgrounds. Enthusiastic supporters were drawn to the promise of school gardens not only as a way to better implement nature study...
    • Page 13

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    • RTI IMPLEMENTATION PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT 9 define essential learning standards; plan and provide high-quality Tier 1 instruction, for all students; constantly assess students learning and instruction effectiveness; and take responsibility for...
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    • 11 Service learning helps promote both intellectual and civic engagement by linking the work students do in the classroom to real-world problems and real-world needs. Without compromising academic rigor or discipline-specific objectives, service...
    • Page 140

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 133 DeRoche, E. & Williams, M. (2001). Character Education: A Guide for School Administrators. Lanham, MA: Scarecrow Press, Inc. DeVitis, J., & Yu, T. (2011a). Introduction. In J. DeVitis & T. Yu, Eds., Character...
    • Page 149

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    • Legion. The escort arrived at Governor Young's at 9:00 a.m. and everyone saluted him at the west door of his mansion as he appeared on the steps.' The residents of Cedar City held their own celebration and Henry wrote the following about the...
    • Page 15

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    • 10 2. activities that are impersonal and unrelated to the day-to-day problems of the participants; 3. professional development that has a district-wide focus and does not meet the needs of the individual schools and teachers (Smith & Kritsonis,...
    • Page 15

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    • 12 The researchers found there were some students who really enjoyed the project and learned a lot from it and those who completed it just for the grade. The researchers suggested that the project was most beneficial if the student could really...
    • Page 15

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    • 10 learning disabilities or those who just struggle in general. Many of these students also have difficulty understanding vocabulary as it relates to their world. Effective Instruction Finding the best programs and the most effective means of...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 interviewer would then ask for clarifying details. The interviews provided valuable information about who dropped out and what would help those that were on the fence about whether or not to quit school. Christensen and Thurlow (2004) reported...
    • Page 15

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    • 1 2 J. Richard Gentry, Ph.D., and author of many books based on spelling research, was asked by the Zaner-Bloser editor Marytherese Croakin to discuss the four most pressing questions teachers have asked about teaching spelling. Here are the...

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