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  • All fields: administrators
(155 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 9

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 2 The development of students’ self-efficacy and social competence as related to character education programming—referred to by some as performance character—is essential, but not well investigated. Anecdotally,...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 4 Delimitations There were many fruitful lines of inquiry that this study did not address. Most notably, this was not a study of the impact that participant perceptions can have on the effective implementation of...
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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 8 The ways that teachers implement art-viewing experiences varies widely. In some classrooms, teachers and students focus solely on creating art. They work through project after project without spending time looking at or...
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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 14 The student could feel pressure to judge all artwork in the classroom as high quality, despite his own personal taste or emotional response (Hamblen, 1987). Discipline Based Art Education. Over time, a new type of art...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 16 and likable”—implied the need for strong modeling of performance character by educators (Noddings, 2011, p. 335). Covey’s “The Leader in Me” (TLIM) program as character education. Stephen R. Covey (2008) stated...
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    • 23 in language arts and math. There are 30 math assessment questions and 25 language arts assessment questions. Students can see their score at the end of each assessment. Test items were developed and analyzed by university educational...
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    • 24 past 10 years confirm the positive effects on students’ mathematics, spelling, and reading achievement when educators depend on CBM progress monitoring to assist them in their instruction (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2004). The senior product manager for...
    • Page 31

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    • 25 to create their own custom tests. These tests can be used to get a more in-depth understanding of each individual’s weaknesses on specific objectives. YPP reports provide details about the skills and concepts tested and include the corresponding...
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    • 22 open-ended question were coded according to emerging themes. Finally, participants were given selected response items to choose from. Samples of surveys, as well as the open-ended question and selected response items are provided in appendices...
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    • 32 English? That's reason enough” (p. 1). This line of thinking is not enough for the average teenage American, though. Apparently it isn't enough for the average Language Arts teacher or state offices of education, either. Substantial proof needs...
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    • 56 For district or school administrators this study should be regarded as a caution that the program is not a silver bullet. Adoption of an AES program will not cure whatever low writing scores a school may have. In fact, for the program to be...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 37 test scores represented significant improvement, in all the interviews conducted with the school, not one parent and/or school worker “mentioned a single thing about higher test scores. All their focus was on...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 38 Both teachers and administrators linked this cultural change directly to increased academic achievement. One administrator noted that since implementing TLIM program her school made Annual Yearly Progress for...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 39 the “results we’ve seen with students is what stands out,” and, “The Leader in Me empowers students to be in charge of their daily actions and learning” (FranklinCovey, 2012, pp. 3-4). Lastly, both...
    • Page 47

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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 40 “feelings of increased order and security” because bullying decreased, explicit leadership roles were fulfilled responsibly, and everyone was more empathetic and approachable “as a result of practicing the...
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    • Running Head: ADVERTISING AND CHARTER SCHOOL FAMILIES 10 When a new traditional public school opens in Utah, the district in which the new school is opening usually revises the school enrollment boundaries and opens with full enrollment. In...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 41 helped them to deal with social problems (e.g., making new friends at school, staying calm in conflicts with siblings, being nicer and knowing how to behave) (p. 20). Two students’ commented about their...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 44 (Berkowitz & Bier, 2005, p. 276). Olsson (2009) most clearly stated the effects of adult modeling in education: “We teach who we are” (p. 43). Berkowitz (2002) expanded on this notion: It is clear that the...
    • Page 68

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    • Appendix G 6.1.4.3. New Major - A sequenced set of courses within a bachelor’s degree program that comprises study in an academic discipline. The major is listed on the graduate credential and signifies that the recipient possesses the knowledge...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 45 “Teachers who view their sole instructional responsibility the dispensing of knowledge and information do well to rethink their teaching mission and reflect on the nature of their roles as educators of youth”...

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