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  • All fields: Wind
(51 results)



Display: 20

    • Chapter I - To America - Page 1

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    • CHAPTER 1 he coastline of England becarne a speck in the distance as Henry Lunt stood on the old plank deck of the ship, Argo, straining to get the last view of his homeland.' It was a bleak n day i January 1850. A cold brisk breeze filled the...
    • Page 44

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    • 41 Scientific Research, Engineering, and Technical Services Careers: Careers/jobs, which involve planning, managing, and providing scientific research and professional/technical services. Example Jobs: Engineer (Aerospace, Chemical, Environmental,...
    • Page 11

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    • dirt . . . which every man is said to eat in his lifetime. It filled our eyes too, and our ears, and our nostrils. It was in the food; it sprinkled the pancakes; it was in the syrup that we poured over them. Half suffocated were we by it, during...
    • Page 12

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    • dangerous. No less dangerous was the task of removing the yokes fiom the impatient creatures and of the unloosing the chains. The romance of being out in the wilds was terribly chilled by an inclement sky. A few days of drizzling rain tried the...
    • Page 13

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    • plains was so well organized that many of the prior problems had been solved and some diarists described the trip as a rather enjoyable event. Henry Lunt's company reached the Great Salt ~ a k valley on e August 28, 1850." After traveling through a...
    • Page 7

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    • Beuna Vista leavirlg Liverpool Fch. 25, 1849, under the direction of Elder Dan Jones, with 249 \Vclch S a i n t on hoard.' Their destination wnc New Orlea~is, Louisiana, in the United Stntrs of .\merica. Thomas Jeremy, m e of the company, dcseribed...
    • Page 36

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    • creeks out of the canyons, widens to encompass an area of good farmland, then tapers off and disappears in the desert gorges and mesas that stretch westward. With the advent of spring, the snow banks melt and disappear, and the mountainsides become...
    • Page 40

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    • for a state road from Peteetneet to Iron Springs, one for an exploration to find a new route from Tooele County to this place via Sevier Lake, and one for a railroad from the Great Salt Lake City to Iron spring^.^ To avoid the wind which blew out...
    • Page 48

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    • th~s volunteer school was superseded by regularly scheduled classes." Smith wrote: "March 19, 1851: The wind blew very hard from the south leaving no tents standing in camp. March 20: Went with Frost and Bringhurst to visit the coal vein [Cedar...
    • Page 32

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    • in the valleys of thc Rio Virgin and Santa Clara Rivers for the purpose of raising cotton.' Later, people were called to settle these areas. Those called were mostly from central and northern Utah. As the months wore on, Thomas l)ecame increasingly...
    • Page 34

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    • made hats for the boys out of round pieces of felt, flared out at the bottom and pointed at the top. A trip to Salt Lake City by wagon was a tremendous undertaking for a woman alone, and six sniall children. 'l'here were probably other people...
    • Page 28

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    • Testimonial videos 28 edited into a “teaser” or “advertisement” designed simply to create interest in the product, and help potential customers overcome some of their apprehension (another weakness discovered though the S.W.O.T. analysis). This...
    • Page 67

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    • The men of Cedar City spent Tuesday, November 25, making a wind break around each of the wagons out of cedar trees. James Whittaker, who had been visiting his family in Parowan, arrived back in the settlement that day with his daughter, Ellen. Many...
    • Page 71

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    • evening meeting where the congregation was addressed by Carruthers and Lunt, after which there was a testimony meeting. Several children spoke and one little boy said he was willing to do as his parents told h q and he also would do whatever...
    • Page 328

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    • a change of labor would be a rest and profitable to my bodily health, so 1 wrote to President Taylor on the subject and it met his approval and, owing to my poor sight, thought it would be a good plan to take my wife, Ellen, with me and that we...
    • Page 60

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    • beef was hidden in thick timber some distance from ramp, while they had been wishing for meat for supper and breakfast, all but one prospector made a hasty getaway before our boys returned from the day's ride." " As I was riding out that morning...
    • Page 341

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    • Webster continued on to the top. We were absent kom the cabin about 3 hours. We concluded a shorter cut could be found than the one we came. We had a storrn tonight and the wind blew cold. Febmary 16: Fine day. After breakfast Brother Webster and 1...
    • Page 104

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    • iron to almost any amount could soon be manufactured. The machinery is of the best kind and works well and would do for a much larger fbmace than what is up. In haste, I am yours, Henry Lunt. The settlers harvested many loads of grass hay from the...
    • Page 88

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    • placed once more in the press for 24 hours.The cheese was then placed on the swinging shelf, after being numhered and buttered to help its curing. The cheese had to be greased and turned over every other day. It took six weeks for even a small...

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