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Display: 20

    • Page 3

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 3 Acknowledgements I would like to thank everyone who helped on this project. First of all, many thanks to Art Challis and Matt Barton for their help on the project. I appreciate their patience and support as I...
    • Page 8

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 8 Suspense and Conflict: One of the most important themes is conflict and suspense. Conflict builds suspense. Tension and suspense are the same thing. Amy Deardon in her book, How to Develop Story Tension discusses...
    • Page 9

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 9 K.M. Weiland in her book Outlining your Novel takes the writer step by step through the outlining process. In Chapter One, she answers the questions of should you outline, what are the benefits of outlining, then...
    • Page 11

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 11 to illustrate his points. He also uses movies that weren’t the success that the producers hoped for to illustrate what happens when ‘Saving the Cat’ isn’t used. The example he used were the two Laura Croft...
    • Page 14

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 14 seems to favor Peeta and she is pretty much left on her own. Then during the games everything she does goes wrong even when it goes right. When Katnis uses the Killerjaks to take out the group from the capitol...
    • Page 16

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 16 Part Two: Presentation I have attended a number of writing conferences ranging from a one-day conference in Kanab, Utah that cost $40.00 to a week-long conference that cost well over a thousand dollars. In...
    • Page 19

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 19 3. It is essential to explain why the number on a slide are important. Take the time to explain charts and graphs. The presenter shouldn’t expect the audience to automatically understand as much about his...
    • Page 20

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 20 Step 4: Additional information. This might not be necessary, but can be added if needed. Lesson 4 This lesson discusses the colors and fonts that work best for a PowerPoint Presentation. Color and text must have...
    • Page 22

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 22 Using the Beat Sheet or how to outline your novel effectively isn’t integral to the actual story. In other words, the reader won’t know if the writer is an outliner or a pantser. A pantser is a writer who just...
    • Page 23

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 23 crashing down on the hero easier to write. If the writer knows what the mid-point scene is, he can build each scene from the beginning to the mid-point. If the writer know what death and despair scene is—this is...
    • Page 25

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 25 your life. There were sections on maintaining balance between home, work, and writing if writing wasn’t yet a full time career. Classes could be taught on query letters and making a pitch to an agent, as well as...
    • Page 27

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 27 Appendix One Script—Core Concepts—1 hour Slide 1—title—taken from Story Engineering—Mastering the 6 Core Competencies of Successful Writing by Larry Brooks Slide 2—Core competency #1--Concept Slide 3--Concept...
    • Page 29

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 29 There are two rules for Box 4. Hero needs to be heroic—no one else can resolve the story or the author has failed the reader. Hero can perish, but must resolve the major elements of the story before he does Slide...
    • Page 42

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 42 Appendix Two Plotting by the Numbers Plotting Using Blake Snyder’s Beat Sheet Plotting by the Numbers Blake Snyder, a screen writer divided a screen play into different beats. I’ve changed the numbers so that...
    • Page 43

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 43 upside down version, the antithesis. These worlds are so distinct that stepping into Act two must be definite. The hero must choose to leave the old world and step into the new one—he is being proactive. This...
    • Page 53

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 53 Appendix Three Your Suspense Toolbox Macro Suspense Suspense is what is going to happen next to your lead character and does it mean death to the hero. Each scene must end with suspense to keep the reader turning...
    • Page 54

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 54 restaurant and a bomb goes off. Suspense is when the audience sees the ticking bomb under the table and wonders when it will go off. Instant Suspense Microobstacles are a seemingly small incident that occurs in a...
    • Page 24

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 20 knowledge are shared across both languages and cultures. Because emerging bilingual students draw on their full linguistic repertoires, teachers, researchers and test-makers need to attend to and design instruments that address what emerging...
    • Page 27

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 23 Revision, of course, is key to successful academic writing. “If we as instructors, can help our students think about their choices after the first draft is out of the heads—but before their final draft is due—we can help them learn to think...

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