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  • All fields: S~ate
(42 results)



Display: 20

    • 1916 88

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    • Athletics ODR i\ l~HLETIC AC1'IVITIES were never in a 1110re. wholesoll1e c~l1d.itioll than at the , present tIme. For. thIS hne of work we have in our school this year a large number of clean, sturdy young men who have the right met­tle, courage~...
    • 1898, Nov 19

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    • Sat. Nov. 19, 1898: Ther. pleasant Wea. S. wind, cloudy S. K. Larson, Dan. Crawford and I came home over the Big Bend. We started from camp 7-10 am. got the C. Creek 9-30 ate breakfast there started 10 am. got home 3-40 pm. being 8 hours and 30...
    • 1910, page 179

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    • 31 Days July 1910: S 24 Dan came up canal with me, We ate dinner at Black Tunnell flume With our wives. M 25 to head of canal and back early. at Ward=Hall pm photographed the indians at noon. T 26 Dan went home today. I am on the ditch again. ...
    • 1912, Apr 30

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    • Tues. April 30, 1912: Ther. Warm Wea. Thin clouds Dan and I are working on the Pine Creek ditch lack about thirty feet of getting it thru the washout Wednesday, May 1: Ther. Warm Wea. Wind Wind We worked on the ditch till noon We then came down to...
    • 1905, Nov 5

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    • Sun. Nov. 5, 1905: Ther. cool Wea. Light clouds Regular fast day ate dinner at 3 pm. Nothing of importance today, till night then we held a cottage meeting at Mr. Sarver’s Elders Lindsay, Ward and I each spoke a few minutes. 97) (1
    • 1905, Nov 25

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    • Sat. Nov. 25, 1905: Ther. Pleasant., Wea. Thin clds. We walked to Hastings to get our mail, got nothing but two hundred tracts. ate some pecans for dinner got back to the school house about 2 pm spent the afternoon studying. had our attendance of...
    • 1908, Nov 8

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    • Sun. November 8, 1908: Pleasant Clear Attended S.S. and meeting. Mon. 9: Coler Clear Went to Rockville on horseback. ate dinner at Aunt Julia’s Tues. 10: Cool Clear Took a photo of R.K. Hepworth’s baby then walked to the mill Wed. 11: Cool...
    • Page 101

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    • the Indian himself at sundown. We told him, through the boy, a great many things about who their fathers were. The Indians worked with the settlers. August 13, 1852: Labored for the Iron Works hauhg loads of adobes, one load of fire clay and one...
    • Page 144

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    • and had no meat and would be very glad if I would have my people give them some flour and potatoes. I said that I would. He had the large [peace] pipe charged and we smoked all around, some twenty braves, the pipe of peace. I then left and attended...
    • Page 148

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    • bread. The night was cold, especially since "some of the boys had neither coat nor vest." The next morning, after they had traveled about seven miles, they found the thieve's campfire, which was still burning. It wasn't long before they caught up...
    • Page 173

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    • For&unately, only one mule was Med, but it took a full day to recover the baggage. The crossing of the east fork of the Colorado River was attended with much difficulty and more danger. Steadily the expedition's food supply dwindled and couldn't be...
    • Page 203

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    • satisfaction to Henry after the meeting about what he had said about the Church]. The Deseret Territorial Fair was taking place in Salt Lake at the time the emigration companies anived. Henry was interested in the exhibit of manufactured articles,...
    • Page 328

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    • a change of labor would be a rest and profitable to my bodily health, so 1 wrote to President Taylor on the subject and it met his approval and, owing to my poor sight, thought it would be a good plan to take my wife, Ellen, with me and that we...
    • Page 340

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    • Lunt Jr. and Francis Webster Jr., each of whom rode a horse and led another, packed. We made a fire, for it was extremely cold, and waited till 8 a.m. when they came along. The boys now took the lead and we foiiowed up, passing aiong up the...
    • Page 400

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    • any longer a sinner. We are living in the same log cabin that Oscar and George built over six years, which was built for a stable, and that is as good as the Savior was bom in. We have a cat and a dog and 30 young chickens and a pig which is a...
    • Page 446

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    • Heaton's wife were ordered to fix a meal for them. They also demanded that Heaton haul a load of corn fiom the bam down to the house to feed their horses. It was fortunate, at the time, that they had a good supply of food on hand so the women fixed...
    • Page 523

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    • Viejo, 468 Villa, Pancho, 485 W Wahlin, Pete, 456 Waldron, Benjamin, cailed on mission l England, 175 o Walker War, 141 Waiker, Arch, 359 Waiker, Charlone, 267 Walker. Chief, friendly, 48; campcd near Fon, 72; uading, 114; coming to Cedar Fort...
    • Page 45

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    • up there. The first mill was able to handle only ten tons of ore a day, but Ily 1871 five mills and a large furnace were in operation. Bullionville and Panaca, seperated by one mile of meadow, lived together in uneasy truce. The good people of the...
    • Page 67

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    • Family Man 67 spoke, all was conducted by Pres. Bechtel, and the program was completed with fireworks! It was the most colossal such show we had ever seen. We said goodbye to the Bennetts (such a short visit) and boarded the bus for Philadelphia....

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