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    • Page 18

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    • opening up to creativity, and collaboration. All of these are beneficial because it requires the teacher to think, change, grown and encourage innovation (Krzystowczyk, 2013). One reason teachers might consider using iPads is that it personalizes...
    • Page 26

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    • Chapter 4 Results This study was examines students’ and teachers’ attitudes toward iPads and their use in the classroom for writing. The data was collected using two different Google Document surveys. Students were given 26 multiple choice...
    • Page 68

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    • From your observations, do students write better quality (fewer errors, address the topic better) with iPads or handwritten? Why? Student's in general have fewer errors and writing is more legible using iPads. About equal. My 7th graders make more...
    • Page 41

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    • 36 Assessment resources included, the PALS 1-3 and a retell rubric were used in the gathering and analysis of comprehension data (see Appendix B). Also, graphic organizers were generated to help the participants record information and to assist...
    • Page 76

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    • 71 Appendix B Retell Rubric used for Scoring Student Retells Comprehension Guide for Expository Text (Assessing Literal Level Comprehension on an Instructional Level Text) Student: _________________________________________________ Date:...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 4 Chapter 1 – Introduction Students are naturally curious, and often wonder about the basis of their education. They ask, “Why do I need to know what a square root is?” or “Who cares about the wars in our...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 19 that have been collected in past lives, and how they will positively or negatively affect the life to come. Therefore if an individual was sinful or negligent in his past lives, he could expect to return in...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 23 Students can enjoy this mystery along with everyone else as they make their own predictions about the purpose of the Peruvian etchings. A great way to parallel this, is, as previously mentioned, is to...
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    • GREEK MYTHOLOGY IN SECONDARY EDUCATION 34 • Did the students participate? • Did you learn something from this lesson? The professional educators were directed to respond in an extremely specific manner, and were asked to answer “Why?” or “Why not?”...
    • Page 8

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    • 2 need to score as proficient or better on its state’s standardized tests. Scores from these subgroups are compared to the scores of their peers. All students, including ethnic minority, low income, and special education students, must meet these...
    • Page 9

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    • 3 14% of White adults (Fry, 2010). As a result of the increased legislation and awareness to the achievement gap, Yearly ProgressPro™, a progress-monitoring instrument, is being implemented to help close it. This computer-administered program...
    • Page 11

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    • 5 Definition of Terms Definitions of terms relevant to this study include the following:  Achievement gap: The disparity in academic achievement between different groups of students, especially groups defined by race/ethnicity, disability,...
    • Page 21

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    • 15 need to be developed so that they provide new ways to assess the non-cognitive skills that students need to succeed in college and in the workplace. Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) proposes that a growth-based evaluation be included into...
    • Page 22

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    • 16 adaptive assessment known as Measure of Academic Progress (MAP). When the student correctly answers questions, they become increasingly difficult. When the student answers the questions incorrectly, the questions become easier (McCall et al.,...
    • Page 25

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    • 19 moved to the next unit, while those who have not achieved it are provided with modified instruction. This evaluation strategy is especially important for at-risk students. Good teachers recognize the importance of assessing students over time to...
    • Page 27

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    • 21 initially established with high correlations between CBM assessments and achievement tests such as the Peabody Individual Achievement Test and the Standford Achievement Test (Deno, 1985). Teachers can identify students who are in need of...
    • Page 29

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    • 23 in language arts and math. There are 30 math assessment questions and 25 language arts assessment questions. Students can see their score at the end of each assessment. Test items were developed and analyzed by university educational...
    • Page 30

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    • 24 past 10 years confirm the positive effects on students’ mathematics, spelling, and reading achievement when educators depend on CBM progress monitoring to assist them in their instruction (Fuchs & Fuchs, 2004). The senior product manager for...

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