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  • All fields: Pacheco
(55 results)



Display: 20

    • 1906, page 38

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    • 38 SOUTHERN BRANCH Heyborne, Robert Cedar City, Iron County Hibgee, Thomas " Holt, Lillie Parthenia Enterprise, Washington County Hulet, John S Summit, Iron County Hunt, Nancy Ellen ...Enterprise, Washington County King, Arthur Coyote,...
    • Page 23

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    • the fourth, Sarah Ann Lunt. married J a n . 16, 1878. to whom eight boys were born. Owing to the anti-polygamy persecutions, he left Cedar City in 1887, together with his wife Sarah Ann and four s o n s , traveling by team through Southern Utah,...
    • Title Page

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    • HENRY LUNT BIOGRAPHY AND HISTORY OF THE DEVELOPMENT OF SOUTHERN UTAH AND SETTLING OF COLONIA PACHECO, MEXICO BY Evelyn K.Jones 1996
    • Page vi

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    • CHAPTER XVIII Civil War Times................................ Page 241 CHAPTER XIX CHAPTER XX The Black Hawk War .........................Page 257 Cedar City in the 1870's and Iron Works at Iron Mountain..........Page 271 St. George...
    • Page viii

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    • was among the first Mormon colonists to settle in Pacheco, Mexico. We have compiled this history to portray in words and pictures the events in Henry Lunt's Life. It is a factual story which could have been made more interesting with a little...
    • Page 206

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    • America was on the ocean for six weeks, and she was so seasick that she wished the ship would sink. Elder Lunt put her in the charge of Brother and Sister Swindle who agreed to furnish her a passage over the plains. They proved to be true and...
    • Page 344

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    • SARAH ANN LUNT Born August 1 1, 1858, Manti, Utah Died December 27, 1921, Pacheco, Mexico Married January 16, 1878, St. George Temple "It doesn't hurt to pinch when you don't have to, but it sure hurts when it is a must" (Photograph obtained from...
    • Page 357

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    • 1 church suit case that the Edmunds-Tucker Law was unconstitutional, you would, with God's blessing, soon see me in old Cedar, but they dare not do it. We must 'do what is nght and let the consequence follow.' 1enclose the last letter 1received...
    • Page 365

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    • impossibity to supply the camp by such a slow and labonous process. The following account of their anival in Mexico is from Broughton's histoiy: We finally reached Deming, New Mexico, a railroad town [40 miles from the Mexican border]. There we...
    • Page 366

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    • streets and a small alley mnning through the blocks both ways to avoid wrrals being built on the rnain street. There were two smdl houses built on the townsite when we arrived, one owned by George Haws and the other by Alexander F. MacDonald, the...
    • Page 375

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    • estate which had been confiscated was likewise retumed to the Church. The manifesto did not announce that polygamous living would be discontinued; it simply said that no more plural marriages would be sandoned. E v q o n e understood that the...
    • Page 378

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    • Sunday, February 4, 1892, was the concluding day of a four-day conference held in Colonia Juarez. At this conference, Apostle George Teasdale, President of the Mexican Mission, chose the leaders of the new mission. He appointed Alex F. Macdonald...
    • Page 379

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    • and they were cooked in every way the women could contrive. Thus the day was saved. This event was no less miraculous than the 'mama' of ancient Israel. Broughton wrote that the year of 1892 was a most desperate one, flour was not to be bought. The...
    • Page 380

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    • have you any more meal you could lend me, my family hasn't a dust of bread stuff in the house.' Father's reply would be, 'Ah, dear brother, you will have to see Sarah.' 1 have heard Mother bear her testimony many times to the fact that she divided...
    • Page 382

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    • weli in spite of the drought in Pacheco. They probably were able to irrigate their crops; and, being at a much lower elevation, nothing would have ftozen.] When we were rnaking preparations for our retum home, the team had to be shod. Alma...
    • Page 383

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    • from the Mexicans and felt that this was an advantage. The natives were afraid of the mountains because they had been a stronghold for the notorious Apache Chief, Geronimo, and his followers until the United States, through a special treaty with...
    • Page 387

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    • Wilson Lunt, their son, and wife, Rosanna Naegle Lunt], a kiss for Johnny [their baby, 7 months oldl--in short, God bless you all. 1 guess poor Randle [Mary Ann's fourth child] is as busy as ever this hot weather. Remember me to Kate [Catherine,...
    • Page 389

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    • not the only one. Sarah brings me word that our two mares each had a fine colt, one was killed by the mountain lions and the other drowned in the nver. Such is He--as the sparks fly upward, so is man bom to trouble. It's an easy thing to...

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