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  • All fields: Outcomes
(391 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 17

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    • 1 4 4. What are some important points to remember about teaching spelling? The key points addressed are spelling must be taught, it must be individualized to meet the needs of the students and it must be taught across the curriculum. Teachers...
    • Page 15

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    • 10 for poor school outcomes, not only because of language issues, but also because of socioeconomic issues (Goldenberg, 2008). Most Hispanic Americans are characterized as having low levels of educational success and high rates of poverty, and this...
    • Page 13

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    • 10 Student Achievement Through the use of InteractiveWhiteboards Through proper professional development trainings and willingness of educators to alter their teaching style, there has been a continuous pattern of how interactive whiteboards have...
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    • 10 the National Research Council Study determined the classification of special education should be considered to be valid based on the following criterion: 1) the general education program is high quality and provides adequate learning, 2) the...
    • Page 13

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    • 10 writing at this institution is not valued as human communication—and this in turn reduces the validity of the assessment (CCCC Executive Committee, 2004). They also have concerns with companies not communicating their algorithms with their...
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    • 11 1995). These deficits may contribute to the fact that Hispanic students, with relatively few exceptions, have had the highest high-school dropout rate of any group in the United States from 1972-2007. High School student dropouts from the low...
    • Page 17

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    • 12 literacy has been studied for better understanding and practice but there has not been as much attention to those adolescents who still struggle with content-area reading. One particular study by Denton, Wexler, Vaughn, and Bryan (2008) was...
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    • 12 rest of their lives. When limits are given, options are taken and enjoyment limited to one area of life or fitness (Torres & Hager, 2007). Also, if we turn our PE classes into giant arenas for intense competitions, teachers leave out the major...
    • Page 138

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    • 128 Hypothesis 1: Information sources have a positive effect on travel motive Hypothesis 1 predicted that information sources would positively affect travel motive and was supported with a coefficient of 0.264. Respondents indicated sources...
    • Page 19

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    • 13 equally important to the physical fitness and activity levels of our students (Taylor, Farmer, Cameron, Meredith-Jones, Williams & Mann, 2011). An effective PE curriculum has long-term benefits. At the middle school level, there are twelve...
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    • 13 parents end up doing the bulk of the homework assignments in order to simply just get it done (Simplicio, 2005). Policies and practices that have formed consistent positive results regarding math homework are: “(a) Homework must help students to...
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    • 15 own education and professional training. More and more states are adopting professional exams to illustrate a teacher’s content knowledge and professional ability; in many states, employment hinges on passing such tests. Pamela Esprivalo Harrell...
    • Page 174

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    • 164 References Doolin, B. (2005). Shaping Technological Outcomes: Website Development in Four Regional Tourism Organisations. Information and Communication Technologies in Tourism 2005 : Proceedings of the International Conference in Innsbruck,...
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    • 17 Motivating Reluctant Readers Finding the “magic potion” to motivate engagement in a young reader is important. “Learning requires active student engagement in classroom activities and interaction—engaged students are motivated for literacy...
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    • 17 skills that participants learned make a difference in their professional practice?” (p. 47). Unfortunately, teachers’ enthusiasm for new strategies upon attending a workshop or conference often wanes, and they simply fall back into their regular...
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    • 18 classroom observations, or evidence of lesson planning. Blank and Alas (2010) directed that “measures of implementation of professional development are critical to evaluation design in order to document and measure activities to reinforce and...
    • Page 24

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    • 19 education specifically (Smith & Kritsonis, 2006, p. 3). Doctors do not attend seminars in order to learn about new Band-Aids; they want to cure patients. Lawyers do not collaborate to determine their best game face; they want to learn skills to...
    • Page 21

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    • 19 school and using a well developed classroom management plan will help teachers to avoid liability issues. Teachers should be advised to develop a classroom management plan with consequences that can be administered exclusively inside the...
    • Page 23

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    • 20 Chapter 4 Results In this chapter, the purpose of the study and research surveys are reviewed followed by an overview of questions asked during individual interviews. Analysis is then provided with summary data. Introduction The purpose of this...
    • Page 24

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    • 20 is the firm belief that parental engagement makes a significant difference to educational outcomes and that parents have a key role to play in raising educational standards. In summary, the more engaged parents are in the education of their...

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