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    • Page 34

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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 35 (Orbe, 1998, p. 8)? This intrapersonal communication can be conscious or subconscious, but illustrates the process by which members of co-cultures assess how their communication will affect their ultimate relationship with...
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    • i Table of Contents Chapter 1: Introduction 1 Chapter 2: Literature Review 7 The Successful and Unsuccessful Student 7 Hardships and Solutions of Math Homework 10 Effective Math Teachings 14 The Importance of Communication between Schools,...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 parents end up doing the bulk of the homework assignments in order to simply just get it done (Simplicio, 2005). Policies and practices that have formed consistent positive results regarding math homework are: “(a) Homework must help students...
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    • 20 is the firm belief that parental engagement makes a significant difference to educational outcomes and that parents have a key role to play in raising educational standards. In summary, the more engaged parents are in the education of their...
    • Page 51

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    • 47 somewhat disappointing discovery was that even when the researcher was actively involved in providing additional daily support, the students’ scores, as a whole, increased minimally. From this disappointing discovery, the researcher came to...
    • Page 56

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    • 52 sources of assessment to accurately and efficiently identify students who need the additional guidance. Daily assessments of any kind provided some of the purest feedback of what a student understood or struggled with. The assessments that were...
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    • 10 the National Research Council Study determined the classification of special education should be considered to be valid based on the following criterion: 1) the general education program is high quality and provides adequate learning, 2) the...
    • Page 29

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    • 23 involves working with word meaning and understanding text. Currently, “direct screenings in the areas of vocabulary and comprehension have yet to be developed for elementary learners” (Mesmer & Mesmer, 2008, p. 289). Fuchs and Fuchs go on to...
    • Page 45

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    • 39 some studies may not be as universal as anticipated but can give a baseline from which to start. All teachers commented on the frustration of seeing the best thing come and go to be replaced by the next best thing. All of the participants were...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 19 outcomes, from “ineffective” to “highly effective”. Based on their research, Gresham et al. (2001) provided a number of recommendations in designing an effective social skills intervention, including...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS social thinking interventions as opposed to social skills interventions. Social thinking interventions promoted the teaching of the “why” behind behaviors without targeting and rewarding individual isolated social...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS programs. Lane et. al. defined organizing intervention groups as the third step in the process. Groups could be organized by class designation, skill deficit targeted, demographics, or even randomly. Training...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS conjunction with the inclusion of students with special needs in regular education classrooms adds weight to the fact that teachers could expect to be increasingly called upon to enhance the social deficits of...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS outcomes across age groups revealed that social skills interventions were most effective with secondary-age students “ (2007). Due to the findings of this literature review, a peer mediated group therapy approach in...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 29 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this creative project was to improve social thinking skills for students with high functioning autism (HFA) in second and third grades in a small rural setting in southern Utah....
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS The curriculum was based on two commercially available social thinking curriculums: Think Social! by Michelle Garcia Winner, and Super Hero Social Skills by Bill Jensen. Lessons were individually tailored to meet the...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS Both students improved their time on topic. Student A increased from 30% of his responses being on topic to 65%. Student B's time on topic at school was not an outlier; therefore specific data was not collected,...
    • Page 47

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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS vocabulary were the most helpful in the home environment. This vocabulary reminds students in an unthreatening manner to think about where they are and what they are doing, and what the social expectations of the...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 47 The Think Social! curriculum was the most natural and easiest to facilitate. This cognitive behavior therapy based curriculum turns abstract ideas, such as why making eye contact is important, into concrete...
    • Page 51

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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS References Aguirre, L., Dohmen, I., Kootsey, B., Krock, L., Levin, D., Lewis, S., Patel, S., Tyson, P., & Vinokour, A. (2005, June). Einstein’s Big Idea. Retrieved from http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/einstein/ American...

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