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  • All fields: Intellectual
(52 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 16

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    • 10 In the math classroom, the student with a specific learning disability in reading may have little difficulty with calculation fluency but is likely to struggle with problems relying on reading comprehension, such as story problems (Jordan,...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 on physical education may result in small gains in academic achievement and Grade Point Average. Observations show a positive connection between academic performance and physical activity, but not physical fitness. This meaning that a child’s phys...
    • Page 14

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    • 11 Service learning helps promote both intellectual and civic engagement by linking the work students do in the classroom to real-world problems and real-world needs. Without compromising academic rigor or discipline-specific objectives, service...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 successfully have a significantly higher community participation rate at cultural, intellectual, athletic, and artistic events (Steinkamp, 1998, 34-59). Additionally, town-gown studies suggest that community members who have benefited from a...
    • Page 18

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    • 14 The intellectual challenge posed by the gap involves isolating its root cause. Lack of knowledge of the lower frequency academic words encountered in school texts, which in turn impedes the natural process of learning new word meanings...
    • Page 18

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    • 15 According to Kassop (2003), the question of the role of the teacher is simplified in online discussion boards, and students are able to learn and teach the content for themselves. Furthermore, Jewell (2005) found that “students are more willing...
    • Page 20

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    • 18 negative, that child’s awareness of contingencies affecting their own behavior is increased (Appolloni, Cooke & Strain, 1976). In some instances, student removal from the classroom and placement in a less stimulating environment such as a...
    • 1902, page 20

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    • 20 SOUTHERN BRANCH a few carefully selected groups of facts taking the place of the more vague and general consideration of the great mass of history. 3 hours per week throughout the year. History of Education.-Lectures, discussions,...
    • 1912, page 22

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    • 22 Copies of the city charter and plan of government have been requested by the management of many educational institutions and many teachers. Chapel. One chapel period a week is conducted by students. Tho no theological creeds can be...
    • Page 30

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    • 24 mathematics. This means that according to a standardized test of cognitive and academic ability, such as the Woodcock Johnson III, the students exhibited a significant discrepancy (defined as 15 points or greater) between their General...
    • 1899, page 28

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    • 28 SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE ZOOLOGY.-This is a thoroughly practical course for teachers, and little attention is given to those subjects which the teacher can not use in common school work. Required of second-year Normal students. 3 hours...
    • Page 36

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    • 29 is saying that having intellectual discussions about grammar is more productive than teaching the rules and hoping that the students will apply what they learn to their own writing. Back in the United States, Dennis Baron summed up the English...
    • Page 6

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    • 3 Academy states that we strive “to help students rediscover the value and rewards of education and guide them in becoming literate, socially-responsible, lifelong learners” (USOE, 2006, p. 3). SEA is an alternative high school in Cedar City, Utah,...
    • 1900, page 30

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    • 30 SOUTHERN BRANCH OF THE ject as are needful for teachers in the grade schools. The course is attended by much practical work with minerals and in observation tours. Required of third-year Normal students. 2 hours per week throughout the...
    • Page 9

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    • 4 be helpful in determining how small-group instruction is administered but may not be beneficial for whole-class instruction. Definition of Terms Definitions of terms pertinent to this study include: • Learning Disability- A discrepancy between...
    • Page 50

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    • 46 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING References Ammer, J.J. (1984). The mechanics of mainstreaming: considering the regular educators’ perspective. Remedial and Special Education, 5(6), 15-­‐20. Blenk, K., & Fine, D.L. (1995). Making school inclusion wo...
    • Page 52

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    • 48 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Schwartz, I., Odom, S., & Sandall, S. (n.d). Including young children with special needs. Retrieved from http://www.newhorizons.org/spneeds/inclusion/ information/schwartz3.htm Seehorn, A. (n.d.). Barriers and benefi...
    • Page 10

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    • 5 • “Learning to Read” Stage- This is the period in school when children are acquiring basic reading skills. Skills include phonemic awareness, phonics, and fluency. This stage usually occurs between kindergarten and third grade. • “Reading to...
    • Page 67

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    • 63 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Repeat directions EMOTIONAL DISTURBANCE Alter the environment Target and change behavior Promote academic and social factors that enhance learning Provide successful experiences Provide ample opportunities for...

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