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Display: 20

    • Page 180

    • Page 180
    •  
    • URIAH TREHARNE JONES Biography 1861 - 1929 Uriah T r e h a r n e Jones was born Feb. 11, 1861 in Cedar City. Iron County, Utah, t h e son of Thomas and Sage Treharne Jones. He had a twin s i s t e r , Sarah Ann, and they were the youngest of a...
    • Page 150

    • Page 150
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    • it for tea and tobacco. Henry and Brother Carmthers gave him what he asked for. A few days before, John D. Lee and Charles Dalton and their wives had brought thirteen cheeses to Henry for the Iron Works. The charge was 25 cents per pound.6 As...
    • Page 151

    • Page 151
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    • retaliation. They never forgot an injury or an injustice. In other words, they subscribed to the worn out code of an "eye for an eye and a life for a life." With them the punishment of crime was a personal, rather than a public, matter. There was...
    • Page 152

    • Page 152
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    • On July 23rd, a contingent of the militia, sent fYom Manti on a scouting expedition, had a "brush" with a band of warriors at Pleasant Creek killing six or seven Indians.'' There were several other skirmishes during the summer. Captain Gunnison,...
    • Page 153

    • Page 153
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    • County, and is strictly enjoined and commanded to enforce the orders. I ...It is distinctly understood that all the people shall assemble into 1 large and permanent forts and no man is at liberty to refuse to obey this order without being dealt...
    • Page 154

    • Page 154
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    • the officers and authorities of the Church of the Legion and of the Temtory, and to all the people, and say unto you all, do not in the least degree relax your efforts to save your grain, your stock, and all your property, and fort up strong and...
    • 1899, May 22

    • 1899, May 22
    •  
    • Mon. May 22, 1899: Ther. warmÂș., Wea. hazy, light clouds, Jake plowed in corn most all day. I fixed the lower partition fence also the outside fence a little. I promised R.B. Moncur 7 steers at $16.25 per head. $113.75 Tuesday 23: Ther. warmÂș.,...
    • 1911, page 12

    • 1911, page 12
    •  
    • 12 with shutters to the windows, so that class work requiring darkness may be carried on during the daytime. MUSEUM. Collections are being made of Indian relics, minerals, plants and animals. The design is to build up a museum that...
    • Page 452

    • Page 452
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    • ROBERT H. LINFORD Biography 1923 Robert Henry Linford was born July 1, 1923, in Panguitch, Utah, t h e youngest son of seven children born to Joseph Henry a n d Luella R. Orton Linford. Being reared in Panguitch a n d attending schools t h e r e ,...
    • Page 159

    • Page 159
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    • interest in occupying the new Town Plot. Later in the season a large influx of immigrants from thenorth came in. We were now nearly 1,000 strong--men, women, and children3'*" There were only twelve white casualties of the Walker War. None of these...
    • Page 454

    • Page 454
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    • follows: Paul Whetman, Weldon Bittick, Harold Hiskey, Jack Carpenter, MacRay Cloward, Tom Cardon, and Lee Fife. A donation from the Cedar Cycle Club of $639.85 was received. It is to be used for bleachers at the proposed "bike track. " Mar. 18,...
    • Page 194

    • Page 194
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    • for the building of the Library Building, found the lowest bid to be $9,500, not considering the heating and plumbing which came to $2,600 to erect the building complete for occupancy. They wished the Council to assist them in raising funds...
    • Page 165

    • Page 165
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    • The flood that Henry referred to was the crowning blow for the Iron Works. It swept over the site, completely submerging the equipment and buildings, and carried away some of the property. Also, with the diversion dam washed out, there was no water...
    • Page 167

    • Page 167
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    • trying to become acquainted with the Indian character and language and to establish schools for that purpose. Brother Snow felt that the settlers should help the Indian children learn the English language, teach them to work, and show them the...
    • Page 168

    • Page 168
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    • dedicated on Christmas day, which day will long be remembered among us. In the morning the Indians [Pihedes], to the amount of some 300, women and children included, gathered into the Fort. We preached to them in their own language and made them a...

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