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    • Page 490

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    • apostles saw i t , was not so much the smelting of iron, vital though this was to the pioneer economy, b u t , more importantly, the building of a harmonious and unified community here on the borders of civilization. This was to be done in spite of...
    • Page 6

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    • beautifid new land. They passed along great swamps of cypress trees which were nonexistent in England. Finally they reached their destination, New Orleans, which was the portal through which most immigrants going west entered. Upon arrival, one of...
    • Page 11

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    • dirt . . . which every man is said to eat in his lifetime. It filled our eyes too, and our ears, and our nostrils. It was in the food; it sprinkled the pancakes; it was in the syrup that we poured over them. Half suffocated were we by it, during...
    • Page 54

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    • arrived at our camp. We fired the cannon six times in welcome." President Young spent the next few days visiting the settlers and giving comforting instructions to those who wanted to go home. He and others in the party visited the gristmill and...
    • Page 55

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    • were no human bones6 The water fiom Center Creek washed out the headgate at the mill race on Friday, May 30. In addition to the water problems, the cattle were destrovine the wheat because of inadeauate fences. President , Smith gave notice that,...
    • Page 145

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    • Works and explained things to them as well as I could. Walker seemed very much pleased and interested with the Works Henry wrote a letter to George A. Smith on February 1I, 1853, telling of the conditions in Cedar City and describing the events...
    • Page 159

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    • interest in occupying the new Town Plot. Later in the season a large influx of immigrants from thenorth came in. We were now nearly 1,000 strong--men, women, and children3'*" There were only twelve white casualties of the Walker War. None of these...
    • Page 228

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    • following are the minutes of the meeting held August 12, 1858: The members met at the meeting house two o'clock p.m.on Thursday. Sister A. Haight gave the meeting into the hands of Brother Henry Lunt, he being present. Opened the meeting by...
    • Page 312

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    • article, but cheap and speedy transportation to the points of demand. Also, Utah is bound at some time to be a great iron-producing and iron-consuming country." The abundance of human resources for this undertakmg was stressed because a large share...
    • Page 322

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    • with the poiiticians in Congress. When the excitement ends, we can talk to them. We do not wish to place ourselves in a state of antagonism, nor act defiantly toward this Govenunent. We will fulfill the letter, so far as practicable, of that...
    • Page 379

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    • and they were cooked in every way the women could contrive. Thus the day was saved. This event was no less miraculous than the 'mama' of ancient Israel. Broughton wrote that the year of 1892 was a most desperate one, flour was not to be bought. The...
    • Page 396

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    • to for a generation. On the 4th of J a n u q President Cleveland signed the proclamation, admitting the people to statehood. The Enabling Act had been signed on the 7th of July 1894. Thus a period of a year and a haif had elapsed, during which the...

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