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    • yearbook1917i077: The Ag. Club

    • Beaver Murdock Academy--Beaver (Beaver County, Utah); School yearbooks
    • The Ag. Club. In the fall of nineteen hundred and twelve, a new organization came into existence within the realms of "Old Murdock." That organization was none other than the Murdock Academy Aggie Club. It was presently to take its place as one...
    • yearbook1917i089: Advertisements

    • Beaver Murdock Academy--Beaver (Beaver County, Utah); School yearbooks
    • Do your trading at the Golden Rule Store, where prices and quality speak for themselves. Marcus Bros., Beaver, Utah. Beaver Equitable Co-op, dealers in General Merchandise, Henry Frazer, Supt. When you trade with us you benefit 50...
    • catalog1921i062p061: Advertisements

    • Beaver Murdock Academy--Beaver (Beaver County, Utah)
    • The Greatest Clearing Sale MILFORD HAS EVER KNOWN We are offering our entire line of U.S. Army and Commercial goods at ridiculously low prices. We were the first to bring prices down in Milford and we still lead in cutting and slashing prices....
    • Page 193

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    • Dec. 19. 1 9 1 2 . . .Mayor Urie stated that we have had a very successful y e a r , free from epidemics of Typhoid and other 1. To contagions. He made recommendations a s follows: extend pipeline to other mountain springs in the Five Lakes...
    • Page 263

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    • Jan. 20, 1927.. .Gronway Parry and Kumen L. Jones of the Rotary Club, Dr. A . C. Johnson and Moroni Corry of the Chamber of Commerce present. Purpose: assisting the City in adding more water to the system. Suggested that the City take steps at once...
    • Page 487

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    • Cedar Commercial Club. The guests were Emerson Hugh, magazine writer of national reputation, Apostle George Albert Smith of the Mormon Church, Stephen T . Mather, Director of the National Park Service, D. S. Spencer, representative of the Southern...
    • Page viii

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    • was among the first Mormon colonists to settle in Pacheco, Mexico. We have compiled this history to portray in words and pictures the events in Henry Lunt's Life. It is a factual story which could have been made more interesting with a little...
    • Page 12

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    • dangerous. No less dangerous was the task of removing the yokes fiom the impatient creatures and of the unloosing the chains. The romance of being out in the wilds was terribly chilled by an inclement sky. A few days of drizzling rain tried the...
    • Page 89

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    • more full report from this expedition at a future day; although the party did not go over the rim of the Basin or extend their research to a very great extent beyond that of last season. One of the greatest evils we have heard reported is the...
    • Page 104

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    • iron to almost any amount could soon be manufactured. The machinery is of the best kind and works well and would do for a much larger fbmace than what is up. In haste, I am yours, Henry Lunt. The settlers harvested many loads of grass hay from the...
    • Page 246

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    • Although the early settlers of Utah had placed more emphasis on celebrating the 24th rather than the 4th of July, Independence Day had gained in significance. July 4, 1861, brought with it an enthusiastic celebration throughout the Utah Temtory, in...
    • Page 258

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    • consequent decrease of the population of Cedar. Two full battalions were there formerly, now there are only about seventy men. Henry Lunt is acting as Major over these and the few men at Hamiltons and Kanarra, and has decidedly more men than arms....
    • Page 472

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    • sting. 1 only hope that our trials will result in the development of a strong character, for our success depends on us individually. We can conquer or be conquered, and ifwe are conquered by conditions, we n have failed i the purpose for which we...
    • Page 31

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    • had to be cleared of sagebl-ush and greasewood. Heavy d r a p were made of tree trunks and poles, and the t~rushwas hurned. T h e plows were made of mountain mahogany and the shares of iron. Often, the land was hard and dry, and water for the...
    • Page 75

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    • Lamanites were deeply interested. T h e country was strange to me. Near the place of our operations was a river that I could see, the water of which was not quite clear). .4s this dream had left quite an impression on my mind, I asked our mother to...

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