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  • All fields: Goetz
(13 results)



Display: 20

    • 1908, page 37

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    • 37 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. GERMAN. MR. JONES. German 1. Joynes-Meissner's German Grammar, Altes and Neues and a number of short comedies by Benedict and Mosher. At least 400 pages of simple narrative prose should be read. Daily...
    • 1909, page 41

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    • 41 STATE NORMAL SCHOOL. Mosher. At least four hundred pages of simple narrative prose should be read. Daily exercises in conversation, practice in pronunciation, and composition will be part of the work, Four times a week. German 2....
    • 1910, page 49

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    • 49 man and Dorothea," Koepenickerstrasse 120, Suddermann, der Katzentag and Johannes. Three times a week. German 3. Schiller's Trilogy, Lager, Piccolomini und Tod. Goethe's Goetz von Berlichidgen, a literary study of same, Nathan der...
    • 1911, page 45

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    • 45 quired for an "American Penman" certificate is required for completing the course. Spelling. Gives drill in words used in commercial life, and in words in common use in the usual vocations. A graduate from this two-year course can make...
    • 1912, page 50

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    • 50 A graduate from this two-year course can make easy money. One year is now added to this course. GERMAN. Mr. Gardner. German. Joynes-Meissner's "German Grammar, Altes and Neues" and a number of short comedies by Benedict and...
    • Page 46

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 42 Harvard grad, a woman who loves to think, could become a homemaker” (Goetz, 2009, para. 5). The implications of people asking her this are, of course, that staying at home requires no intelligence, so why would an intelligent...
    • Page 48

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 44 Economic stigmas. The final stigma was an economic stigma, meaning that people made judgments about a family’s economic situation if the mother stayed at home. One woman explained being told that “…with today’s economy...
    • Page 50

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 46 While some of the women wanted to validate the false sentiments of feminism, the majority wanted to validate themselves as feminists. One woman expressed, “I am doing the jobs I once ridiculed and which I once saw as degrading...
    • Page 51

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 47 Educational validation. The women were concerned with validating themselves educationally, meaning they talked about their education and qualifications that would have enabled them to work outside the home if that is the path...
    • Page 54

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 50 her staying at home was not what she wanted but it was the only thing they could afford. Thus, these women validated that they are being economically responsible and saving their families money by staying at home. Comparative...
    • Page 74

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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 70 Fisher, W. R. (1987). Human communication as narration: Toward a philosophy of reason, value, and action. Columbia: University of South Carolina Press. Flanagan, C. (2006). To hell with all that: Loving and loathing our inner...
    • Page 89

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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 90 Newton, J. H. (2009). Photojournalism: Do people matter? Then photojournalism matters. Journalism Practice, 3, 233-243. doi: 10.1080/17512780802681363 Oxford English Dictionary (2010). New York: Oxford University Press. Paivio, A....
    • Page 90

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    • PHOTOGRAPHY 91 Steffensen, M. S., Goetz, E. T., & Cheng, X. (1999). The images and emotions of bilingual Chinese readers: A dual coding analysis. Reading Psychology, 20, 301-324. Thompson, R., & Haddock, G. (2012). Sometimes stories sell: When are...

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