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  • All fields: GRADES
(81 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 55

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    • Appendix B Language Arts Teacher Survey Grades 7-8 given through a Google Drive survey Writing in Language Arts-Teacher Survey * Required My students like to write.* o Strongly Agree o Agree o Disagree o Strongly Disagree Writing on iPads is...
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    • 7th Grade Language Arts Only-For second quarter of the 2013-2014 what were the grades of your students in Language Arts? Fill out all grades that apply to what you teach. How many students received 8th Grade Language Arts Only-For second quarter of...
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    • Girls and Relational Aggression 44 Appendix A Parent Consent Form Dear Parents or Guardians, I would like to invite your student to participate in a valuable research program being held at your school during the After School Program. A researcher...
    • Page 69

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    • resources already out there. I use the iPad mostly with reading. Students can look up information and books or articles of interest and they can read narrative texts easily there. I use the iPads mostly with writing. Even in the reading class, we...
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    • 15 With regard to reading, basic oral English language vocabulary is not enough to help ELLs succeed academically. They may read and speak fluently but if they do not have the breadth and depth of the vocabulary, they struggle. They need to see...
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    • 13 that considers the whole context of teaching interactively with interactive whiteboards. Teachers also need to consider a cross-curricular approach to using interactive whiteboards, giving more opportunities for pupil interaction with the board...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction – Nature of the Problem It is well known that students go through what is commonly referred to as “the fourth grade slump.” Research presented by Hall, Sabey, & McClellan (2005) and Fang (2008) has shown that this “slump”...
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    • 2 knowledge. Students are explicitly taught in the younger grades how to identify characters, setting, and plot. Students entering fourth grade are provided with textbooks in the areas of Social Studies and Science. They are asked to read the...
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    • 6 Chapter 2 Literature Review The National Center of Educational Statistics concluded that more than two thirds of students are not proficient readers (Biancarosa, 2005). This is a staggering statistic that leads one to question. How can teachers...
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    • 7 text structure, retelling, and summarizing as some of the main components that aid in the comprehension of expository text. Different strategies for each, as well as multiple strategies are examined in this literature review. Breakdown in...
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    • 8 readers need to be taught strategies, as well as how, where, and when to apply these strategies. The National Reading Panel identified the five elements of reading. The five elements include phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and...
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    • 9 require specific instruction that focuses on the specific skills needed to comprehend expository text (Fang, 2008). Teaching Comprehension Strategies In order to help students with learning disabilities comprehend expository text, it must be...
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    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
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    • 4 various areas, predominantly dyscalculia, in grades ten through twelve in a large high school in an urban school district. Delimitations As a quasi-experiment the scope of this study did not involve large numbers of students nor did it randomly...
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    • 3 In order to best serve the needs of students, AHS had several programs that help students meet their graduation goals. There were book clubs, mini-classes in a variety of subject areas, and collaborative groups. One program was a collaborative...
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    • 4 Collaborative methods: Students working with a teacher and other students to earn credit. Researcher Qualifications The researcher was a graduate student in the Master of Education program at Southern Utah University. She obtained her bachelor’s...
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    • 19 Retelling. Unlike summarizing, a retell is a recall of everything that was remembered from the reading. In a retelling the student is not concerned with the main idea and supporting details, but is instead concerned with the content as a whole....
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    • 11 interviewer would then ask for clarifying details. The interviews provided valuable information about who dropped out and what would help those that were on the fence about whether or not to quit school. Christensen and Thurlow (2004) reported...
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    • 24 mathematics. This means that according to a standardized test of cognitive and academic ability, such as the Woodcock Johnson III, the students exhibited a significant discrepancy (defined as 15 points or greater) between their General...
    • Page 311

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    • later, a Professor from the Columbia School of Mines, John S. Newberry, visited southem Utah and was amazed at the coal and iron resources in the area. He encouraged the local officials and business leaders to patent and develop the rich store of...

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