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  • All fields: Degrees
(31 results)



Display: 20

    • Big Spring

    • Arizona Strip (Arizona); Springs--Dixie National Forest (Utah); Big Spring (Mohave County, Arizona)
    • Big Spring, (camera south 20 degrees from spring, 1000 ft. and fronting on 32 degrees east).
    • Big Spring

    • Arizona Strip (Arizona); Springs--Dixie National Forest (Utah); Big Spring (Mohave County, Arizona)
    • Photo taken 20 degrees east 100 ft. from spring, looking 20 degrees west directly at the spring.
    • Cold Spring

    • Arizona Strip (Arizona); Springs--Dixie National Forest (Utah); Cold Spring (Mohave County, Arizona)
    • Camera south 70 degrees west 460 feet from spring and pointing to 70 degrees east, directly at spring. Benson on foot Hoyt on horse.
    • Cold Spring

    • Arizona Strip (Arizona); Springs--Dixie National Forest (Utah); Cold Spring (Mohave County, Arizona)
    • Camera south 70 degrees west 460 feet from spring and pointing 43 degrees west.
    • Page 471

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    • 55 stoves 9 swords 1001 lbs. of powder a n d lead 44 saddles 436 lights of glass (8 x 1 0 ) 1 9 0 lbs. of nails 137 chopping axes 45 mowing scythes 45 sickles 7 2 scythes and grain cradles 98 hoes 110 spades and shovels Carpenter tools--9t s e t s...
    • Page 495

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    • manufacture of iron. Drama, for which Cedar has now become nationally known, was a favorite interest and avocation of the townspeople from the earliest days. Amusements, recreations of various kinds, and celebrations of important events livened up...
    • Page 26

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    • children sat by improvised stoves wrapped in blankets with their feet on hot rocks.12 They remained camped at Payson the next day, taking inventory of the livestock, provisions and contents of each wagon. They also organized themselves into...
    • Page 32

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    • that had been killed and put them on the feet of the cattle. The following day the road took them over high mountains and deep ravines through deep snow, but they traveled nine miles to Dry Creek. There was a severe snow storm the morning of...
    • Page 38

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    • mission." In the morning the company split up to examine all aspects of the valley as to water, soil, and facilities for farming. The group, consisting of ten men, drove through the cottonwood valley and came to a small ridge of mountains on the...
    • Page 45

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    • decision had been made yet to settle Cottonwood Valley (Cedar City). On Monday, February 3, while Smith was plowing and sowing wheat, Ammon, the brother of Chief Walker, assisted him in this task and expressed the desire to farm and live like the...
    • Page 55

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    • were no human bones6 The water fiom Center Creek washed out the headgate at the mill race on Friday, May 30. In addition to the water problems, the cattle were destrovine the wheat because of inadeauate fences. President , Smith gave notice that,...
    • Page 172

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    • maintained the records. He regarded it as routine to take readings on the stars late at night, sometimes standing waist-deep in snow. His maps were used by thousands of immigrants on their travels to Oregon and California. Fremont's report...
    • Page 279

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    • schools. Our Cooperative store paid thirty-one per cent on a capital stock of $4000, one thousand of this being invested in a threshing machine. Our Sheep Cooperative herd brought, d things considered, about i $450, and we are indulging in the...
    • Page 295

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    • so rank that the husbandman wiil have about as much trouble to clear it off and prepare for another crop as to cultivate it as above mentioned. Some of t h s growth of weeds wiii be ten or twelve feet high. 1 have been into the fields to observe...
    • Page 387

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    • Wilson Lunt, their son, and wife, Rosanna Naegle Lunt], a kiss for Johnny [their baby, 7 months oldl--in short, God bless you all. 1 guess poor Randle [Mary Ann's fourth child] is as busy as ever this hot weather. Remember me to Kate [Catherine,...
    • Page 421

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    • 1 arn informed by good authority that the railroad running fiom El Paso to Casas Grandes is going to be extended to the river, Piedras Verde, on to the Sierra Madre Mountains on which we are located and will open up rnany valuable locaiities for...
    • Page  35

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    • the sand was blowing like sleet against the house and much of it was coming in under the door. In fact, hefore they left it was necessary to shovel the sand away from the door to make a pathway out. Lehi later, recalling this event, said that he...
    • Page 81

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    • experiences almost unbelievable with snowstorms, boxed canyons, thick cedar and pine forests, and food shortage. Their experience almost made the journey of the good Chtholic Escalante, look like a picnic party." " Just before reaching the camp of...

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