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    • Page 39

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    • The Human Element 34 2006, para. 9). The key word here is observable. Many practitioners overlook the fact that all aspects of a community are observable. And that they can refer back to humanities’ original roots in anthropology to gain a better...
    • Page 60

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    • No pirates no princesses 55 Navigation through the culture and a feeling of directional helplessness is expressed by the mothers in this study. As participant one said, ―they don‘t come with an instruction manual‖ so the mother is left...
    • Page 27

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    • U.S. Embassy 27 A career as a Foreign Service Officer is incredibly interesting and rewarding in several ways. For me, the most enticing aspect is being able to live in various countries. For each country an officer moves to, he is provided with an...
    • Page 97

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    • P a g e | 97 resisted they beat her with their clubs. Her ‗doek‘ (headscarf) fell off her head—they beat her some more. They threw her in the back of the police van and speedily drove away. For a few moments I was frozen by the horrific sight...
    • Page 45

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    • The Human Element 40 Chapter 4 Method In an attempt to isolate and reveal variance among separate cultures, researchers have identified numerous dimensions of cultures. Hall (1976) introduced the continuum structure for understanding dimensions,...
    • Page 46

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    • The Human Element 41 A managerial approach to studying cultures comes from the work of Laurent (1983) and Victor (1992). Laurent identified four dimensions or parameters, as he refers to them: perception of organizations as political systems,...
    • Page 47

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    • U.S. Embassy 47 seems to stand alone in the text itself. There are no other metaphors on the page that support this metaphor in any way. I haven’t had much luck with any other metaphors that would allow me to really analyze the character of the...
    • Page 101

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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 102 Chapter 6: References Anderson, J. M. (1979). The polygamy story: Fiction and fact (first ed.). N.p.: Publishers Press. Ardener, E. (1978). Some outstanding problems in the analysis of events. In G. Schwinner (Ed.), The...
    • Page 102

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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 103 Darger, J., Darger, A., Darger, Va., Darger, Vi., & Adams, B. (2011). Love times three: Our true story of a polygamous marriage. New York, NY: HarperOne. Davis, A. D. (2010, December). Regulating polygamy: Intimacy, default...
    • Page 103

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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 104 Hymes, D. (1972). Models of the interaction of language and social life. In J. Gumperz & D. Hymes (Eds.), Directions in sociolinguistics: The ethnography of communication (pp. 35–71). New York: Holt, Rinehart & Winston....
    • Page 81

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    • The Human Element 76 Another case in which the LDS culture manifested itself through its community members was during a natural disaster. The culture has taught them to always be prepared and to keep food storage that they could rely on, decreasing...
    • Page 490

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    • apostles saw i t , was not so much the smelting of iron, vital though this was to the pioneer economy, b u t , more importantly, the building of a harmonious and unified community here on the borders of civilization. This was to be done in spite of...
    • Page 12

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    • 7 First program that was designed to support language, literacy, and pre-reading development of preschool-age children, especially those from low income families (U.S. Department of Education, n.d.). Many immigrants of today come to the United...
    • Page 33

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    • 20 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design religious pages while western fonts may say something about equestrian web sites. Sans serif fonts convey a modern or straightforward im-pression while serif fonts may convey a tradi-tional feeling. An...
    • Page 37

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    • 24 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design or other elements that promote interest and attract viewers. c. Direction- positioning of elements to pro-mote the movement of the eye in the de-sired way. Illustrations may “point” to other items. Photos...
    • Page 117

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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
    • 1911, page 50

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    • 50 of the canning of fruits and the, cooking of vegetables, fruits, eggs, meats and batters; proper care of the kitchen and dining room and their furnishings; and the serving of a meal. One laboratory period and one lecture per week. Two...
    • Page 31

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    • 26 Conclusions and Future Research Much remains to be learned about educating Hispanic ELLs, who are rapidly becoming the largest student minority population in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2006). There is a great need for research on how...
    • Page 7

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    • Commitment 2 that employed almost 4,300 people and brought in revenue of $489 million (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009). Discussing the importance of love, Chapman (2010) stated: Love is the most important word in the English language—and the most...
    • Page 28

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    • 22 students’ investment in school learning appears to increase” (Haneda, 2006, p. 343). ELLs can then feel safe to learn in this type of school environment as it allows them become active readers and writers when exposed to new texts. It is not...

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