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  • All fields: Cultures
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    • Page 78

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    • 74 Davis, B. H., Resta, V., Davis, L.L., & Camacho, A. (2001). Novice teachers learn about literature circles through collaborative action research. Journal of Reading Education, v 26 n3, 1-6. Demos, E.D., & Foshay, J.D., (2010). Engaging the...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 3 Abstract This project seeks to understand safety cultures in organizations and how the safety culture can be improved as a result of an implementation of a Safety Culture Model and a seven step process for emergency response for...
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    • MUTED MOTHERHOOD 14 Chapter 2: Literature Review Just as the introduction shows that stay-at-home mothers have not had a voice in society, academic research shows that women in general have historically been robbed of their voice (Ardener, 1975,...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 13 Literature Review A topical literature review is used for understanding contributions of specific areas and determines where this project fits in the puzzle of communication research. Organizational Culture In order to create or...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 14 insider as ‘culture’” (p. 128). More broadly, in studying organizational culture, an interpretive approach is called for. An interpretive approach allows researchers to view truth as subjective and to stress the participation of...
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    • P a g e | 2 Abstract This discussion presents human communication, locally and globally, in relation to theory and experience. Thus questions arise such as, why does violence and conflict reign in society when social media allows efficient...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 18 their way through networks of individuals and institutions. Gay (1997) wrote, “When the occupational health literature does not address organizational culture, it tends to construe culture as a product of managerial values that...
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    • P a g e | 6 INTRODUCTION The central point of human communications in all cultures is found in an ancient African philosophy called Ubuntu. Ubuntu exhibits, throughout this paper, to promote humanism on a national and global scale. According to...
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    • pressure, and enthusiasm and passion (Beaven & Wright, 2008). All of these attributes can be developed through experience. In conclusion, engaging in an empirical learning experience is beneficial for a student. By engaging in that sort of...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 25 learning from stories to be safer would be the primary purpose of stories. The Chemical Safety Board which was created as a national investigative board, tells a video story of each accident they investigate that resulted in...
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    • always have similar responses to the ads. In fact, most same-culture participants had opposite opinions. From this data he determined that gender perceptions depend more on consumer personality than their culture. His results concluded that...
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    • We know cultures view gender differently and part of the reason for why they do depends on what type of culture they are: individualistic or collectivist. An individualistic culture can be described as a culture that is independent and values the...
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    • that is superior or has something better to offer than its competitors. In a collectivist culture, competition is advanced through the cooperation of products, or connections brands and products have to one another (p. 4). Gurhan-Canli and...
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    • research that content in advertisements is specific to culture and diverse innovative advertising strategies need to be used for different cultures. They also found that cultural background influences which advertising appeal is used. Limitations...
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    • P a g e | 13 Hendriks does not stop at this point but delves into the roots of the problem. He explains "Where have all the fish gone?" (Swanson, 2009.) The fishing village developed around the harbor because of its fishing potential, allowing the...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 31 Many facts were shared in question number three on the interview guide. Researchers looked at industry averages for recordable injuries found on OSHA’s website to determine whether or not the number of recordable injuries...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 33 Conclusion RQ 1: How will the creation and implementation of a safety culture model improve safety culture perceptions for industrial organizations? By implementing a safety culture model for industrial organizations, they can...
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    • P a g e | 18 CHAPTER 2 Ubuntu Concepts Ubuntu a hope for all human cultures induces cultural knowledge, and understanding from deep within. Ubuntu allows for reflexivity and reciprocity through communication with awareness of humility and...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 34 Discussion This discussion section addresses several key components which include: Importance of findings, Limitations, Future Research, and Final Thoughts. Why are the findings important? Interviewees responded 67 percent...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 35 We found prior to this project, organizations assessed their safety culture almost exclusively on the facts in the organization. “How many recordable injuries, lost time injuries, or fatalities have you had?” - was the big...

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