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    • Page 117

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    • 110 Nolen, J. L. (2003). Multiple Intelligences in the Classroom. Education (Chula Vista, Calif.), 124(1), Retrieved from http://www.hwwilson.com/ Overholt, J., Aaberg, N., & Lindsey, J. (1990). Math stories for problem solving success. West Nyack,...
    • Page 18

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    • 15 1986, 93). Service learning is one of the ways in which we maximize the benefits that students receive from our nation’s universities. However, in order for service-learning to be successful, it is essential for three specific criteria to be...
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    • 20 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design religious pages while western fonts may say something about equestrian web sites. Sans serif fonts convey a modern or straightforward im-pression while serif fonts may convey a tradi-tional feeling. An...
    • Page 28

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    • 22 students’ investment in school learning appears to increase” (Haneda, 2006, p. 343). ELLs can then feel safe to learn in this type of school environment as it allows them become active readers and writers when exposed to new texts. It is not...
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    • 24 Chapter 2 Planning for Web Design or other elements that promote interest and attract viewers. c. Direction- positioning of elements to pro-mote the movement of the eye in the de-sired way. Illustrations may “point” to other items. Photos...
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    • 24 needs to be debunked. A Canadian study that has emerged based on literacy pedagogy in the 21st century is The Multiliteracy Project that prepares students for new literacies in a global and diverse world. The term multi-literacies is a more...
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    • 26 Conclusions and Future Research Much remains to be learned about educating Hispanic ELLs, who are rapidly becoming the largest student minority population in the United States (U.S. Census Bureau, 2006). There is a great need for research on how...
    • 1911, page 50

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    • 50 of the canning of fruits and the, cooking of vegetables, fruits, eggs, meats and batters; proper care of the kitchen and dining room and their furnishings; and the serving of a meal. One laboratory period and one lecture per week. Two...
    • 1912, page 54

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    • 54 This course is especially valuable to young people preparing for teaching. HISTORY OF EDUCATION. Mr. Barton. This will consist of discussion and topical studies on the different ideas of education, for the...
    • Page 12

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    • 7 First program that was designed to support language, literacy, and pre-reading development of preschool-age children, especially those from low income families (U.S. Department of Education, n.d.). Many immigrants of today come to the United...
    • Page 78

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    • 74 Davis, B. H., Resta, V., Davis, L.L., & Camacho, A. (2001). Novice teachers learn about literature circles through collaborative action research. Journal of Reading Education, v 26 n3, 1-6. Demos, E.D., & Foshay, J.D., (2010). Engaging the...
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    • always have similar responses to the ads. In fact, most same-culture participants had opposite opinions. From this data he determined that gender perceptions depend more on consumer personality than their culture. His results concluded that...
    • Page 490

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    • apostles saw i t , was not so much the smelting of iron, vital though this was to the pioneer economy, b u t , more importantly, the building of a harmonious and unified community here on the borders of civilization. This was to be done in spite of...
    • Page 7

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    • Commitment 2 that employed almost 4,300 people and brought in revenue of $489 million (U.S. Census Bureau, 2009). Discussing the importance of love, Chapman (2010) stated: Love is the most important word in the English language—and the most...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 13 Literature Review A topical literature review is used for understanding contributions of specific areas and determines where this project fits in the puzzle of communication research. Organizational Culture In order to create or...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 14 insider as ‘culture’” (p. 128). More broadly, in studying organizational culture, an interpretive approach is called for. An interpretive approach allows researchers to view truth as subjective and to stress the...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 18 their way through networks of individuals and institutions. Gay (1997) wrote, “When the occupational health literature does not address organizational culture, it tends to construe culture as a product of managerial values...
    • Page 24

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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 25 learning from stories to be safer would be the primary purpose of stories. The Chemical Safety Board which was created as a national investigative board, tells a video story of each accident they investigate that resulted in...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 3 Abstract This project seeks to understand safety cultures in organizations and how the safety culture can be improved as a result of an implementation of a Safety Culture Model and a seven step process for emergency response for...
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    • LIFE ON THE LINE 31 Many facts were shared in question number three on the interview guide. Researchers looked at industry averages for recordable injuries found on OSHA’s website to determine whether or not the number of recordable injuries...

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