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    • iii Abstract This thesis introduces conclusions about Stephen Covey’s “The Leader in Me” (TLIM) program—a performance character education program—into the academic literature on character education. Using a phenomenological, case study methodology,...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 2 The development of students’ self-efficacy and social competence as related to character education programming—referred to by some as performance character—is essential, but not well investigated. Anecdotally,...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 5 Definitions Character education. Character education is the process of educating students about metacognitive, academic (executive-functional and non-cognitive) and socio-emotional skills that empower them to...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 6 relationships, and make decisions based on ethics and responsibility. This set of skills enables students to self-regulate, resolve conflict, and lead effective lives. Support for and further explication of this...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 13 understanding character education in today’s schools. Three characteristics of quality character education were particularly relevant for the purposes of this study: overt, intentional, and integrated...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 16 and likable”—implied the need for strong modeling of performance character by educators (Noddings, 2011, p. 335). Covey’s “The Leader in Me” (TLIM) program as character education. Stephen R. Covey (2008) stated...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 17 establish priorities, and to execute a plan by staying disciplined and focused. Embedded in the three habits are time management skills, planning skills, goal-setting skills, and other basic organizing skills...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 18 life skills, respectively. Figure 1 provides a comparison between TLIM program’s habits and key factors of social and emotional Learning (SEL). Using the Collaboration for Academic, Social, and Emotional...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 21 suggest that the funding of the research affects the quality of the studies’ methodology (although this potential bias is discussed more in Chapter 5), but rather to note that academic researchers have not...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 22 The Case for Character Education in Elementary Schools The majority of character education programs in the United States have been implemented in elementary schools (c.f., Social and Character Development...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 28 Self-efficacy significantly influenced one’s self-regulation, a key component in learning academic, social and emotional skills (Maddux, 2009, p. 339). Derrington and Goddard (2008) defined self-efficacy as the...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 30 strategies a focus of professional practice, for they are important components of motivation and of academic achievement” (Pajares, 2002, p. 121). In this way, character education, including the TLIM program,...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 32 attachment, relational trust, sense of belonging, or sense of community)” was a foundational aspect of character education (p. 269). This was because, developmentally speaking, the process of character...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 34 the impact of social emotional interventions on students’ academic success. Finally, the House Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Youth, and Families (2000) provided testimonial support for character education’s...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 35 concluded, “Though mostly anecdotal, the preliminary findings above offer tangible, promising encouragement to The Leader in Me schools of all sizes and types, and all across the globe” (Hatch, 2012, p. 11). He...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 36 increasing student achievement by 11-17 percentile points (Fonzi & Ritchie, 2011, p. 20). Fonzi and Ritchie qualified this fact, insisting that “more documentation on the implementation of systematic research...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 37 test scores represented significant improvement, in all the interviews conducted with the school, not one parent and/or school worker “mentioned a single thing about higher test scores. All their focus was on...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 43 creates empowered and engaged individuals. In the Covey model, every student is a leader (Covey, 2008, p. 76). This fact illustrates the pedagogy of student empowerment that undergirds the notion of character...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 44 (Berkowitz & Bier, 2005, p. 276). Olsson (2009) most clearly stated the effects of adult modeling in education: “We teach who we are” (p. 43). Berkowitz (2002) expanded on this notion: It is clear that the...
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    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 75 “Please share any additional thoughts/comments about using the ‘Leader in Me’ program in your classroom/school.”—yielded responses from the teachers and the principal that, upon analysis, centered on specific...

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