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    • yearbook1917i077: The Ag. Club

    • Beaver Murdock Academy--Beaver (Beaver County, Utah); School yearbooks
    • The Ag. Club. In the fall of nineteen hundred and twelve, a new organization came into existence within the realms of "Old Murdock." That organization was none other than the Murdock Academy Aggie Club. It was presently to take its place as one...
    • mcbooki062p036: Cove Fort (cont.)

    • Beaver County, Utah--History
    • travelers and freighters. It's beginning was somewhat different from the forts that have been mentioned before and was built for the protection of settlers that were to build communities. It was built of black volcanic rock laid in lime mortar, 100...
    • Page 146

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    • GEORGE W. MIDDLETON Biography 1866 - 1938 George W . Middleton was born December 10, 1866, in Hamilton Fort. Utah, the son of John and Jane Withers Middleton. After spending his youth in Southern Utah and leaving to finish his education in...
    • Page 255

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    • take charge of all concrete work. Forms were not feasible because there was nothing to brace to; consequently, the walls were placed with a rather d r y mix, riither than poured. The first water turned into the reservoir c:aused a crack and a...
    • Page 57

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    • to be . . . Yours forever faitally and affectionately, Martha Bristols Henry managed to focus his mind on the things at hand, since he was so busy working with the settlers to build a community. He toiled in the fields every day until the last rays...
    • Page 70

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    • stated that they had been sent especially by the President to go forthwith and test the qualities of the iron ore and send back a sample with all possible haste. They, therefore, required a certain number of the brethren to come forward and assist...
    • Page 104

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    • iron to almost any amount could soon be manufactured. The machinery is of the best kind and works well and would do for a much larger fbmace than what is up. In haste, I am yours, Henry Lunt. The settlers harvested many loads of grass hay from the...
    • Page 143

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    • that I wished for the brethren to run with buckets, which they immediately did. Thinking it wisdom to go and see Chief Walker the while, I did so When I first entered his tent, which was very extensive and an excellent one, he shook hands with me...
    • Page 150

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    • it for tea and tobacco. Henry and Brother Carmthers gave him what he asked for. A few days before, John D. Lee and Charles Dalton and their wives had brought thirteen cheeses to Henry for the Iron Works. The charge was 25 cents per pound.6 As...
    • Page 260

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    • beautiful and secluded vale. 1 could not but notice with great pleasure and satisfaction the labors of Brother Jessie Eldredge who is teaching school. The scholars are learning unusually fast and are much attached to their teacher. They have got...
    • Page 313

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    • as "Mount Henry" with an elevation of 9,000 feet. At the intersection of South Creek and Coal Creek was a cabin listed as "Lunt's Rock Cabui." The Walker's Mine was i Maple Canyon and the Lunt Mine n was east of the Lunt Cabin about one mile." It...
    • Page 31

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    • had to be cleared of sagebl-ush and greasewood. Heavy d r a p were made of tree trunks and poles, and the t~rushwas hurned. T h e plows were made of mountain mahogany and the shares of iron. Often, the land was hard and dry, and water for the...
    • Page 40

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    • camps was the product of many small farms and dairies combined. Few families had enough surplus to justify a trip on their own. In 1870. Iron Ciounty had 264 farms, most of them composed of less than 10 acres. Consequently, shipping to the mines...
    • Page 52

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    • In 1867, Josiah Rogerson, who was schooled in the operation of the telegraph, came from Beaver to Cedar City to give instruction to interested people who could hegin operating the telegraph line in Cedar City. Among those to be instructed were...
    • Page 58

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    • accumulated sornc cattle of their own and no longer felt it necessary to lease these cattle, Lehi and his younger brothers leased them. They received a percentage of the cattle as p a p e n t for their work. By receiving about 215 of the calves...
    • Page 118

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    • approximately eighteen months . A state of droutb ensued, and Lehi and Dave lost many animals. They were forced to move the cattle out of "Pipe" to various places in order to find more feed. They trailed 2.400 head Inck to Cedar City and on out to...
    • Page 155

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    • with John L. Sevy, who had seen them and asked for a ride back to Cedar City that night. He and Mr. Sevy traveled up the canyon from Newcastle past Castle Ranch and on to Irontown and then past Woolsey's Ranch to Cedar City. It took them most of...
    • Page 185

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    • ing Rass took the sheep through New Castle and on toward the Holt Ranch. Lehi M. stopped at Willard's farm to get some more hay. \Vhile he was there he noted that at 9 : 00 A.M. it was 18 degress below zero. He caught up with Rass and they went on...

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