Skip to main content

SUU Digital Library

Add or remove other collections to your search:



Narrow your search by:



You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: Benefit
(93 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 15

    •  
    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
    • Page 18

    •  
    • 12 rest of their lives. When limits are given, options are taken and enjoyment limited to one area of life or fitness (Torres & Hager, 2007). Also, if we turn our PE classes into giant arenas for intense competitions, teachers leave out the major...
    • Page 19

    •  
    • 13 When results are positive, the school and its stakeholders can claim an excellent academic program; however, when results are negative, they list the many reasons why high-stakes testing is a poor indicator of school success. In order to...
    • Page 19

    •  
    • 14 Other vocabulary programs are available, but not many have been carefully researched and approved. “Few independent research studies have been conducted on popular commercial reading programs, but the use of such programs in secondary schools is...
    • Page 20

    •  
    • 14 using scores to evaluate schools and teachers, and as a requirement for grade promotion, “can have a negative impact on student learning” (Henning, 2006, p. 729). Henning and his group of 24 teachers looked at four types of analyses that would...
    • Page 23

    •  
    • 17 can help educators guide instruction for all of the students in their charge. Assessments should be useful, meaningful, informative, and educative. They must capture and communicate judgments about student work and show students how to be better...
    • Page 17

    •  
    • 17 classifies as “covenantal relationships” (Waters, 2011, para. 8). Covenantal relationships are identified by Waters as having “the common good of all parties involved [as] the relationship’s goal.” Networks were examined by the strength of their...
    • Page 21

    •  
    • 18 Instrumentation The data were collected through quantitative measures. I relied on the use of pre-treatment and post-treatment surveys. I used an adaptation of the Universal Encouragement Program (UEP) survey that our counselor has included on...
    • Page 22

    •  
    • 19 particular study. I entered the parts of the survey that would benefit this study into a Google Document Form and administered both the pre-treatment and post-treatment surveys online. I focused on whether or not exposing students to various...
    • Page 25

    •  
    • 19 stepping, chanting and clapping as they read. After the kinesthetic exercise, students wrote a small paragraph that showed their comprehension of the reading (Peebles, 2007). Ms. Peebles is also an advocate for reader’s theater, which encourages...
    • Page 28

    •  
    • 22 Admittedly, just as evidence is lacking for learning-styles based teaching, there is also a dearth of hard evidence supporting the use of kinesthetic strategies in the classroom. Existing studies are small, limited, and inconclusive. Although...
    • Page 27

    •  
    • 22 disabilities in recent years. These strategies, which have been shown to help students, should be implemented into classrooms today to help students better comprehend expository text. Students should be benefiting from the research-based...
    • Page 25

    •  
    • 22 needed to refer back to this information were unable to do so. Absent students had to learn the concept on their own, or find a time when the teacher and student could meet together to allow the educator to teach the student the concept missed....
    • Page 34

    •  
    • 28 subtracting the pretest scores from the post-test scores. Thus the number represents the percentage of growth obtained by a given student. The third column represents the percentage of growth achieved by individual students during Topic II...
    • Page 8

    •  
    • 3 1. With explicit instruction, did students’ comprehension of expository text improve? 2. Which instructional strategy was most effective in teaching expository text to primary grade students with disabilities? This study offers further insight...
    • Page 36

    •  
    • 30 Figure 1: 𝑘−𝑛𝑛 for Classes A and B Combined In order to prove that something is statistically significant, the researcher needs to test the alternative hypothesis against the null-hypothesis. In this case, the null hypothesis is that kinesthetic...
    • Page 40

    •  
    • 34 Chapter 5 Discussion Interpretation of Results Traditional classroom instruction has typically consisted of lectures coupled with note-taking, guided practice and independent practice, culminating with assessment. This sedentary, cerebral...
    • Page 41

    •  
    • 35 variable of the differences in classes, the mean of 𝑘−𝑛𝑛 for Class A at 13.27 % may paint a more accurate picture of the benefits of kinesthetic learning, and can be considered statistically significant. Similarly, the p value for 𝑘−𝑛𝑛 at 0.6%...
    • Page 53

    •  
    • 47 Teacher Training. Educators should receive training on interpreting student data in order to use the results to guide their classroom instruction. Teachers should also receive training on how to use the exercise and custom test portions of the...

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK