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  • All fields: Benefit
(235 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 12

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    • 10 philosophy that educators can recognize signs that indicate a potential for inappropriate behavior (Murdick, 1996). It is preferable to prevent inappropriate behaviors rather than wait until after the behaviors occur before responding. Students...
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    • 11 engaging if they include names of students in the class. Students often benefit from creating problems for each other (Wadlington and Wadlington, 2008). Writing stories and listening to books are not the only ways an individual...
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    • 11 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING least restrictive to meet their individual needs. According to Essex (2008), the least restrictive environment begins with placement in the everyday classroom. However, IDEA recognizes that all children do not fit in...
    • Page 15

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    • 11 on physical education may result in small gains in academic achievement and Grade Point Average. Observations show a positive connection between academic performance and physical activity, but not physical fitness. This meaning that a child’s ph...
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    • 12 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Social Skills According to McCarty (2006), the fact that students with disabilities can be joined socially with their peers is one of the greatest benefits. As disabled students are included in the regular classroom,...
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    • 12 regularly features service learning, students’ participation in service learning is noted on transcripts, outstanding students receive service-learning scholarships, awards and commencement regalia and faculty are eligible for grants or...
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    • 12 supports” (Ysseldyke, Burns, Scholin, & Parker, 2010, p.58). Tier 2 intervention, generally consists of small group differentiated instruction that is explicit and systematic (Bursuck & Blanks, 2010; Greenfield et al., 2010; Vaughn & Fuchs,...
    • Page 16

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    • 13 Burstein, 2006). Interestingly, despite the high correlation of AES to human scores, and the newer software, in 2006 the AWA switched to using IntelliMetric, a program developed by another company (Dikli, 2006; Grimes, Warschauer,...
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    • 13 Gardening Association (Blair, 2009). School gardens surged particularly in urban school districts because researchers found that “non-White students from financially unstable backgrounds who [were] not regularly exposed to open green spaces...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING their nondisabled classmates. Furthermore, Seehorn (n.d.) points out that by being included, students will be exposed to opportunities for problem solving that will help them as they function outside of the classroom...
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    • 13 parents end up doing the bulk of the homework assignments in order to simply just get it done (Simplicio, 2005). Policies and practices that have formed consistent positive results regarding math homework are: “(a) Homework must help students...
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    • 13 The benefits of recess are more apparent with lower-­‐elementary students than upper-­‐elementary students because young children need more breaks throughout the day than older children in order to process information. Due to the cognitive i...
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    • 14 allowed to draw the ideas presented (Nolen, 2003). He/she likes to work with maps, puzzles, charts, visualizations and images (Denig, 2004). Students all benefit from visuals. Today, individuals with learning disabilities are mainstreamed. Chris...
    • Page 18

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    • 15 1986, 93). Service learning is one of the ways in which we maximize the benefits that students receive from our nation’s universities. However, in order for service-learning to be successful, it is essential for three specific criteria to be...
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    • 15 Inclusion is the least restrictive of the four timeout procedures. Inclusion involves placing a student in a separate area inside the classroom where instruction can be observed, but where interaction with peers is denied for a given period of...
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    • 16 In another study, IntelliMetric’s accuracy when compared with human scores was debated. When the study, performed in Texas, indicated that the IntelliMetric scores did not correlate with human scores, the researchers developed the hypothesis...
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    • 16 reading achievement among children across most of the countries, and that higher economic levels of a country were related to richer home-literacy environments, whereas lower economic levels were associated with poorer home-literacy...
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    • 16 that may be part of the problem” (para. 363). Research shows that educators are able to enhance academic achievement (Condron) through ability grouping. This method is explained as “…the process of teaching students in groups that are...
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    • 17 The benefits of learning in school gardens can be plentiful. The school, community, teachers, families, and students, all benefited from school gardens. Interdisciplinary learning. School gardens have been a tool to teach multiple subjects at...

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