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    • Page 6

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 6 emotion and dialogue to pitching to an agent, what a writer needs to know about self-publishing, designing a novel cover and how to write a great first page. Those people who teach these classes go through the...
    • Page 23

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 23 crashing down on the hero easier to write. If the writer knows what the mid-point scene is, he can build each scene from the beginning to the mid-point. If the writer know what death and despair scene is—this is...
    • Page 26

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 26 References “Advantages and Disadvantages of PowerPoint.” Boundless Communications. Boundless, 26 May. 2016. Retrieved 06 Jun. 2016 from...
    • Page 43

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 43 upside down version, the antithesis. These worlds are so distinct that stepping into Act two must be definite. The hero must choose to leave the old world and step into the new one—he is being proactive. This...
    • Page 44

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 44 out that last, best idea that will save himself and everyone around him. But at the moment, that idea is nowhere in sight. We must be beaten and know it to get the lesson. Break into Three (85)—thanks to what...
    • Page 53

    • Writing--Technique; Fiction--Technique
    • Writing the Great American Novel 53 Appendix Three Your Suspense Toolbox Macro Suspense Suspense is what is going to happen next to your lead character and does it mean death to the hero. Each scene must end with suspense to keep the reader turning...
    • Page 44

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 40 final data analysis. In order to assure that the results are valid (meaningful) and reliable (consistent), the questions will be clear and purposeful. Samples of the instrumentations that will be used for this research are found in Appendix B,...
    • Page 56

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 52 Finally, exit card results (see Appendix B), while extremely useful throughout the metacognitive-enriched course, were not kept for this paper’s interpretive analysis. Their purpose was to provide a quick, informal self-assessment, along with...
    • Page 125

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 121 retention, and application is in the hands—or brains—of the learners themselves. The students are basically the experts (Nielsen, 2012). Isn’t it time, therefore, to tap into that power once and for all—especially when it comes to teaching that...
    • Page 126

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 122 Carroll, J., Wilson, E. & Folini, G. (2008). Prentice Hall Writing and Grammar. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Donham, J. (2014). College ready—What can we learn from first-year college assignments? An examination of...
    • Page 127

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 123 Preus, B. (2012). Authentic instruction for 21st century learning: Higher order thinking in an inclusive school. American Secondary Education, 40(3): 59-79. Retrieved on February 5, 2014 from Academic Search...
    • Page 131

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 127 Apendix B Sample Exit Card Questions 1. Based on teacher feedback, which revision strategy could I use to improve my writing? Why? 2. What are two things I can do to improve the organization of my narrative piece? 3. Which argument(s) in my...
    • Page 132

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 128 Appendix C Sample Survey 1. Gender: a. Male b. Female 2. Grade: a. 11th b. 12th 3. How would you best classify your English proficiency level? a. Native English speaker b. Native Spanish speaker with 2 years Intensive English c. Native Spanish...
    • Page 136

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 132 (36) Few movie stars have become quite famous. Charlie Chaplin became famous. (37) Chaplin created a distinctive character. The character was known as "the little tramp." The character dressed in enormous shoes, baggy pants, and a bowler hat....
    • Page 137

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 133 Read the following passage. Then, answer the questions below the passage by identifying the letter of the best answer. 1Today many people are singing the praises of electronic mail. 2Electronic mail is fast, cheap, and easy to send. 3You can...
    • Page 138

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 134 Standardized Test Practice Read the passage, and choose the letter of the word or group of words that belongs in each space By late July last summer we (41)____ no rain for six weeks. On nine days during that period, temperatures (42)____ to...
    • Page 139

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 135 a. She c. hers b. Her d. they ____ 20. Refer to Test Practice (45). a. We c. ours b. their d. us Standardized Test Practice In the following sentences, identify the letter of the underlined word or phrase that contains an error. ____ 21. In the...
    • Page 140

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 136 No clocks have changed (41) over time than pendulum clocks. The pendulum clocks that we use today are (42) to earlier models than are any other types of clocks. Of all pendulum clocks, the (43) were built by a Dutch scientist named Christiaan...
    • Page 141

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 137 1Hardly no relics are more famous than the Liberty Bell, which sits outside Independence Hall in Philadelphia. 2Patriotic citizens proceeded to ring the bell for awhile when the Declaration of Independence was adopted in July 1776. 3Being that...

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