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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction Nature of the problem There is a tremendous amount of pressure placed upon students and teachers to achieve proficient scores on end of level math testing. High expectations dealing with math have created many different...
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    • 10 for poor school outcomes, not only because of language issues, but also because of socioeconomic issues (Goldenberg, 2008). Most Hispanic Americans are characterized as having low levels of educational success and high rates of poverty, and this...
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    • 11 common in evidence due to degradation or even contamination, such as from other DNA or inhibitors. The more loci that can be detected allow for much more discrimination between individuals and thus simpler for identification among those...
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    • 11 demonstrate positive attitudes toward learning mathematics are found to have more positive attitudes and higher self-efficacy when it comes to mathematics (Wilkins, 2000; Sewell and Hauser 1980). Wilkins (2000) points out that parents who have...
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    • 12 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Social Skills According to McCarty (2006), the fact that students with disabilities can be joined socially with their peers is one of the greatest benefits. As disabled students are included in the regular classroom,...
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    • 12 systematic and explicit instruction in phonological awareness, phonics, vocabulary, reading comprehension, and fluency” (Cavanough, Kim, Wanzek, & Vaughn, p. 9). The literature shows that kindergarten-reading skills can be predictive of...
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    • 146 Chapter 8 Web Design With Photoshop 7. Now we are ready to start saving the image as the pages of our web site. If you are working in a student lab at SUU, you can save the pages in your “F:\public_html” folder. If not, you can save the...
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    • 15 achievement in reading is higher at the end of the school year than it was at the beginning of the year (Al Otaiba, Kosanovich-Grek, Torgesen, Hassler, & Wahl, 2005). One study shows that, when using ability grouping for reading instruction,...
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    • 16 prompts them to think about the salient features of each problem. This discussion helps them gage what they do and do not understand, as well as develop their own problem solving strategies (Cooper, 1999). Many educational theorists have...
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    • 18 discovery that emerged from this qualitative study were the differences in the amounts of literacy activities that took place per hour. For example, even though these families were all from low- SES backgrounds, researchers categorized them into...
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    • 19 concept addresses conservation of energy in chemical interactions. It does not address the concept of increase in disorder. This is a concept missing from the Utah Core and will be discussed later in the literature review. This standard is...
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    • 2 behind academically they lose a certain amount of self-confidence. This is especially crucial when dealing with math. The time restraints in a regular education classroom make it difficult for a teacher to address the varying problems of each...
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    • 20 is the firm belief that parental engagement makes a significant difference to educational outcomes and that parents have a key role to play in raising educational standards. In summary, the more engaged parents are in the education of their...
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    • 22 A common interpretation of the link between low parental knowledge and child/adolescent problem behavior is that parents, by actively monitoring the nature of their adolescents’ activities and companions, are better able to intervene, which in...
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    • 22 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this study was to examine the academic gains of students entering kindergarten at below-grade level, on-grade level, and above-grade level, to determine the amount of progress made throughout the year....
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    • 22 Furthermore, Marinak and Gambrill have suggested that books as rewards for increased reading are a gratifying, successful reward for students. Specifically, when offering extrinsic rewards for reading, books are less undermining to intrinsic...
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    • 23 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING Inclusion programs are successful when they include teachers who communicate with one another, plan together, and hold similar philosophies (Schwartz et al., n.d.). The question is not if we should collaborate with o...
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    • 24 In 2010 Stoner and Slover Linett Strategies approached CASE (Council for Advancement and Support in Education) with a plan to better understand how advancement offices in higher education were using social media. The concern came from the lack...
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    • 24 INCLUSION: IN SERVICE TRAINING students. The special and classroom education teachers must ensure the success of all students with special needs by making certain that appropriate strategies are being used in the classroom (Sue, 2008). Karen (2005...
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    • 26 individual optimism about their skills as a reader). Additional reasons for reading participation, as addressed by Guthrie and Anderson, are recognition (the desire to be known as a good reader), competition (the desire to be the best reader in...

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