Skip to main content

SUU Digital Library

You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: Achieve
(58 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 7

    •  
    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction-Nature of the Problem In today’s public schools, every 8th grade girl is registered in a physical education (PE) class and expected to achieve the same norm-based criterion as the girl next to her. Schools need to provide a...
    • Page 13

    •  
    • 10 choosing to attend a post-secondary institution. The researchers defined college qualifications as being a culmination of cumulative grade point average, senior-class rank, aptitude test scores, and SAT/ACT test scores. They stood by their point...
    • Page 15

    •  
    • 11 interviewer would then ask for clarifying details. The interviews provided valuable information about who dropped out and what would help those that were on the fence about whether or not to quit school. Christensen and Thurlow (2004) reported...
    • Page 19

    •  
    • 13 Researchers from the Northwest Evaluation Association (NWEA) examined the levels of academic achievement by comparing how 14 different states set proficiency levels for both math and reading tests. The researchers determined that what is...
    • Page 21

    •  
    • 15 (Conner & Norman, 1995). Completion of an activity may be enough for some students to feel success, while others may need to be proficient in order to enjoy that success. This confirms the importance of teachers giving positive feedback and...
    • Page 21

    •  
    • 16 For educators, the challenge is to continue to investigate and develop new programs to help all students to perform and achieve their full potential. Research and development of new teaching techniques will always be a continuing effort in...
    • Page 21

    •  
    • 16 Text structure. Expository text is organized into different structures. These structures include sequence, compare and contrast, description, cause and effect, and problem and solution (Akhondi, Malayeri, & Samad, 2011; Moss, 2004). Each...
    • Page 19

    •  
    • 16 The survey provided qualitative measures necessary to assess students’ attitudes towards the SMART interactive whiteboard versus the traditional whiteboard. The surveys include five questions scaling different degrees of responses about the...
    • Page 23

    •  
    • 17 can help educators guide instruction for all of the students in their charge. Assessments should be useful, meaningful, informative, and educative. They must capture and communicate judgments about student work and show students how to be better...
    • Page 8

    •  
    • 2 ensures each level of student feels safe, happy and successful at their ability level. Differentiated instruction in a whole-group setting does not have to add to the burdens of a regular classroom. Rather, it can bring fun and excitement to...
    • Page 6

    •  
    • 2 prepare for their future. Christenson and Thurlow (2004) found that the cost of dropouts is "estimated in the billions of dollars in lost revenues, welfare programs, unemployment programs, underemployment, and crime prevention and prosecution"...
    • Page 26

    •  
    • 20 Third, focus activities are used to, again, maintain a routine and ensure students feel comfortable and know what is expected. Starting class on the right note is imperative. For example, if the instructor is not prepared to start class, it...
    • Page 32

    •  
    • 27 to meet standards for success set forth by state and nation. ELLs come from a variety of cultures and backgrounds and with knowledge they attained from previous experience. As I started this project, like most teachers that want to make a...
    • Page 32

    •  
    • 28 Chapter 5 Discussion Introduction Graduation has been a long-standing problem for alternative education students. The drop-out rate for alternative students, especially those at Alternative High School, was uncommonly high, 86%. The traditional...
    • Page 33

    •  
    • 29 Another possible explanation for the success of the collaborative group might be the maturity level of students. Regardless of the type of student involved in the collaborative group, the students who were the most motivated and mature completed...
    • Page 35

    •  
    • 29 school night. Instructor met with parents and explained that their students would be graded individually in all areas and modifications would be made to address any injuries or other concerns. Students and parents were informed that student...
    • Page 8

    •  
    • 3 Chapter 2 Literature Review The focus of this literature review was on adolescent ELLs in terms of reading struggles and comprehension in the American mainstream classroom and what can be done in the classroom to help meet their current needs. In...
    • Page 10

    •  
    • 3 person is limited in learning opportunities and lacks the skills necessary to create communication beyond what he or she hears. Now, as an English teacher, this teacher-researcher wonders how much grammar to teach each year. The current Utah...
    • Page 33

    •  
    • 30 and overall excitement in learning a new concept. The students’ felt highly motivated due to the involvement in matters that are closer to them and to the use of technology. The researcher also discovered that the students liked the...
    • Page 35

    •  
    • 30 Kieffer, M.J., & Lesaux, N.K. (Sept. 2010). Morphing into adolescents: active word learning for English-language learners and their classmates in middle school. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 54(1), 47-56. doi:...

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK