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  • All fields: 2012*
(853 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 25

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 21 While more needs to be done to understand and evaluate bilingual students’ writing in both languages, this research should provide teachers of these students with enough insight not to compare their bilingual students’ abilities in either...
    • Page 26

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 22 interviews with students in classrooms where metacognitive strategies were used, Preus reported that the students she observed talked about how the teachers used T-charts and organization charts to help them organize their thinking, how teachers...
    • Page 27

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 23 Revision, of course, is key to successful academic writing. “If we as instructors, can help our students think about their choices after the first draft is out of the heads—but before their final draft is due—we can help them learn to think...
    • Page 28

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 24 learning processes, to engage in a dialogue with themselves, and be conscious of their learning as a process facilitator of knowledge (Arroyo & Quintana, 2008). According to Smith (2010), if we can get our writing students, including our basic...
    • Page 29

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 25 later use (Nielsen, 2012). Research suggests that because a person’s working memory is strained during the writing process, it is important for writers to include a stockpile of the processes and strategies of writing into their long-term...
    • Page 30

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 26 participation in the development of self-assessment criteria, question cards, rubrics, and checklists. Students should be responding to their writing in a global way and evaluating specific aspects of their writing in order to improve both the...
    • Page 31

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 27 When students develop a sense of self-efficacy in their writing, they will be able to make a distinct connection between practice and ultimate writing achievement—if they work hard, they will achieve successful academic writing outcomes....
    • Page 32

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 28 All learners are motivated by the desire to improve. When instructors help students find their own mistakes and evaluate their own work, their motivation increases exponentially. Secondary educators would do well to recognize that along with...
    • Page 35

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 31 those identified as important by instructors responsible for college first-year writing programs” (2008, p. 3). When students are engaged in conversations about their writing through peer reviews and different types of portfolio assignments, “a...
    • Page 36

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 32 and quality feedback, and careful revision strategies. Although L1 and L2 learners benefit from quality teacher feedback, such as ways to expand their ideas, elaborate on their main points, paraphrasing and in-text referencing, ESL students...
    • Page 38

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 34 processes and began to engage in self-dialogue, they developed self-efficacy, habits of learning to learn, and ultimately gained more writing experience and confidence (Arroyo & Quintana, 2008). Viewing bilingual students as a writing asset...
    • Page 39

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 35 More research is needed on how best to prepare teachers for authentic and inclusive teaching. In addition, more research is needed on the connection between fostering high quality intellectual work and producing graduates with the skills needed...
    • Page 112

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 108 overall writing abilities. “Yes, because it covers every concept that we should know to be a good English writer,” and “I like the test because I can see how and in what way I’ve improved, and in what areas I need to put more effort.” (The...
    • Page 113

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 109 the importance of deep self-reflective analysis of how they learn, they will become better learners and, therefore, better writers. Recommendations Similarities and Differences of Research Results and the Work of Others Extensive research has...
    • Page 114

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 110 effective writing results. Therefore, before taking time to assess and evaluate, all writing teachers need to spend more time allowing students to think before they write, time to think and reflect after they write, time to rewrite, and finally...
    • Page 115

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 111 ESL and bilingual instructors. Although further research should be conducted on how ESL instructors can fully capitalize on their students’ bilingualism and how it can “foster their biliteracy” (Butvilofsky & Sparrow, 2012), the results from...
    • Page 119

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 115 inspiration is slower to emerge; and red, when “desperation is high. I don’t know how to put ideas onto paper.” Another student compared himself as a writer to a turtle. “Slow imagination; shell is a comfort zone. It’s a protection against...
    • Page 125

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 121 retention, and application is in the hands—or brains—of the learners themselves. The students are basically the experts (Nielsen, 2012). Isn’t it time, therefore, to tap into that power once and for all—especially when it comes to teaching that...
    • Page 126

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 122 Carroll, J., Wilson, E. & Folini, G. (2008). Prentice Hall Writing and Grammar. Upper Saddle River, New Jersey: Pearson Prentice Hall. Donham, J. (2014). College ready—What can we learn from first-year college assignments? An examination of...
    • Page 127

    • Writing--Education; Composition (Language arts); College preparation programs; Education, Secondary
    • 123 Preus, B. (2012). Authentic instruction for 21st century learning: Higher order thinking in an inclusive school. American Secondary Education, 40(3): 59-79. Retrieved on February 5, 2014 from Academic Search...

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