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  • All fields: 2010*
(187 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 9

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    • relevant information (Walsh & Simpson, 2013). Both traditional and digital processes support each other, and students return to what their teachers have taught. Students need to know how to navigate, read, take notes, evaluate, write, and search...
    • Page 11

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    • Writing Literacy is the tool wealth, not just economic wealth but wealth of the mind (Poore, 2011). Literacy allows students to know how to discriminate what they hear because students can participate as well as create (Poore, 2011). If teachers...
    • Page 14

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    • more diverse audience. 78% agree that digital technologies encourage creativity. 79% agree that digital technologies encourage collaboration amongst students. These teachers view cell phones, social networks and texting as a way to aid student...
    • Page 15

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    • individual idea generation, defining rules for document management, identifying roles for group members, communicating ideas, and managing conflict (Dillon, 1993). According to Heitin (2008) writing with paper and pencil is most often done by just...
    • Page 19

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    • Addressing teachers’ fear of technology and student success. “Two concerns that teachers have about using technology such as IM or blogs with their students is that students will not take the work seriously and will not use what they have learned...
    • Page 20

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    • Writing with pen and pencil should not be completely forgotten. According to Snell: Writing with pen and paper felt appreciably different from typing. My mind would try to race ahead, but my pen could only go so fast. I ended up considering every...
    • Page 43

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    • handwrite, and why they do or do not feel they write better with their iPad. This could be due to lack of teacher training on how to implement iPads into the curriculum (Figure 6) or difficulty typing on a small computer. Social media New...
    • Page 47

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    • Mehta, J. (2013). Why American education fails. Foreign Affairs, 92(3), 105-116. Murray, O., & Olcese, N. (2011). Teaching and learning with iPads, ready or not?. Techtrends: Linking Research & Practice to Improve Learning, 55(6), 42-48....
    • Page 15

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    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
    • Page 19

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    • 14 Another suggestion to activate interest and increase students’ vocabulary about a specific topic is through the use of informational alphabet books (Yopp & Yopp, 2000). Prior to studying a specific topic, the teacher will have students...
    • Page 20

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    • 15 get an idea about the topic. The students, using the pictures as guides, make predictions about the text and its contents. Just as picture walks are associated with narrative text, text feature walks should be associated with expository text...
    • Page 21

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    • 16 Text structure. Expository text is organized into different structures. These structures include sequence, compare and contrast, description, cause and effect, and problem and solution (Akhondi, Malayeri, & Samad, 2011; Moss, 2004). Each...
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    • 20 Due to the complex nature of summaries, some students may require a paragraph frame. The paragraph frame consists of three to four sentences containing blanks for students to fill in with their newly acquired information. Students are initially...
    • Page 26

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    • 21 The Four-Part Lesson Cycle created by Montelongo et al. (2010) addressed vocabulary, text structure, modified sentence completion, and rewriting the text. This four-step cycle spanned a five-week period and showed a significant amount...
    • Page 56

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    • 51 Chapter 5 Discussion This action research study was designed to assess the results of teaching expository text comprehension to primary grade students with disabilities. In teaching it is critical to identify which instructional strategies are...
    • Page 62

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    • 57 actively participated in both the creation of the group organizers and their own individual organizers. The only concern that this instructor had with the group was that they finished the lessons early. They probably could have used a few more...
    • Page 63

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    • 58 frontloaded new vocabulary. After seeing all of the strategies that are incorporated in text features instruction, it did not seem so unusual that they scored higher than the vocabulary and text structure groups. During instruction, participants...
    • Page 64

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    • 59 the “High 5!” multiple methods approach conducted by Dymock and Nicholson (2010) and the Four-Part Lesson Cycle created by Montelongo et al. (2010) were highly effective. While this multiple methods strategy was shown to be the most effective,...
    • Page 70

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    • 65 References Abadiano, H. R., & Turner, J. (2002). Reading expository text: The challenges of students with learning disabilities. The NERA Journal, 38(2), 49-55. Akhondi, M., Malayeri, F.A., & Samad, A.A. (2011). How to teach expository...

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