Skip to main content

SUU Digital Library

Add or remove other collections to your search:



Narrow your search by:



You've searched: All Collections

  • All fields: 1999*
(52 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 43

    •  
    • Girls and Relational Aggression 39 References Bremer, C., & Smith, J. (2004). Teaching social skills. Information Brief, 3(5). Crick, N., Casas, J., & Mosher, M. (1999). Relational and overt aggression in preschool. Developmental Psychology, 33(4),...
    • Page 44

    •  
    • Girls and Relational Aggression 40 Pediatrics, 126(2), 298-305 Kawabata, Y., & Crick, N. (2011). The antecedents of friendship in moderately diverse classrooms; social preference, social impact, and social behavior. International Journal of...
    • Page 16

    •  
    • EFFECTS OF BACKGROUND MUSIC 12 that did not involve music. In one individual study, 10 children with Autism, ages 5 months to 9 years old, participated in 20 sessions of using songs during the lesson to help improve their rhythmic speech and...
    • Page 49

    •  
    • DAVID’S VS. GOLIATH 49 Beach House PR. (n.d.). Beach House PR. Retrieved April 21, 2014, from http://beachhousepr.com/about/ Bella Public Relations, New York City. (2009). Bella PR New York City. Retrieved April 21, 2014, from...
    • Page 51

    •  
    • DAVID’S VS. GOLIATH 51 Glaser, J. & Laudel, G. (2013). Life with and without coding: Two methods of early-stage data analysis in qualitative research aiming at casual explanations. Forum: Qualitative Social Research, 14(2). Global Media PR. (2014)....
    • Page 9

    •  
    • 5 Chapter 2 Literature Review Alternative High Schools For years, high schools had a one size fits all mentality. Students were expected to learn the same way, study the same way, and learn the same things. If traditional school did not work for...
    • Page 10

    •  
    • 6 Kennedy and Morton (1999) believed that a center for alternative learning should operate based on the individual. They believed that many of the issues with alternative high schools resided in the fact that all drop-outs were grouped together;...
    • Page 19

    •  
    • 15 students that had previously given up to learn what was necessary to graduate and move on with their lives. The teachers were a key factor to allowing the curriculum to work for the student and discover alternatives for making learning work. One...
    • Page 20

    •  
    • 16 A School for Healing (1999) claimed that it is one of the most powerful interventions that could be used with at-risk students. Summary The collaborative group setting in all of these intervention examples helped increase graduation rates and...
    • Page 36

    •  
    • 32 References Aronson, R. (2001). At-risk students defy the odds: overcoming barriers to educational success. Lanham, MD: The Scarecrow Press. Ascher, C., & Maguire, C. (2011). Beating the odds. Education Digest, 76(5), 13-20. Retrieved from...
    • Page 37

    •  
    • 33 Knutson, G.G. (1999, February 2). Alternative high schools: models for the future?. Retrieved from http://horizon.unc.edu/projects/HSJ/Knutson.html. Mata, E. (2011). Reason to hope. Diverse: Issues in Higher Education, 27(25), 16. Retrieved from...
    • Page 49

    •  
    • 43 with classroom curriculum. Art Education, 60(4), 33-38. Retrieved from http://www. highbeam.com/doc/1P3-1313669451.html Nemirovsky, R. & Rasmussen, C. (2005). A case study of how kinesthetic experiences can participate in and transfer to work...
    • Page 31

    •  
    • Testimonial videos 31 References Altman, W. W. (2006). 5 years since the bubble burst: Has the internet changed the way business is done?. Engineering Management, 16(6), 42-43. Bandura, A. (1999). Social cognitive theory: An agentic perspective....
    • Page 6

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 7 passive learning, are fundamental to the learning and cognitive processes of students today” (p. 55). Many educators are struggling to find solutions to the shifting needs of students. Research suggests that by...
    • Page 8

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 9 Literature Review Communication Theory Human beings have been communicating since the dawn of time. From cave drawings to drum sounds, the earliest humans discovered and developed ways to send messages to one another. Since...
    • Page 10

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 11 for auditory learners. The aid may also include space for students to write their own information for read / write learners. Visual aids are a powerful tool for students from all learning styles when used properly. George...
    • Page 26

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 27 http://www.msmc.la.edu/include/learning_resources/todays_learner/the_net_generation.pdf. Cooper, C. (2014). Millennials and the explosion of visual learning. Propoint.com. Retrieved from...
    • Page 27

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 28 Fleming, N. (2001). VARK -- A guide to learning styles. VARK -- A Guide to Learning Styles. Retrieved from http://www.vark-learn.com/. Garside, C. & Edwards, K. (1996). Teaching communication theories: An experiential...
    • Page 28

    •  
    • COMMUNICATION THEORIES 29 Katsioloudis, P. (2010). Identification of quality visual-based learning material for technology education. Journal of Industrial Teacher Education, 47(1), 71-99. Kenner, S. (2014). Infographics best practices....
    • Page 14

    •  
    • PERCEIVED OUTCOMES OF TLIM PROGRAM 7 Chapter 2 Literature Review Character Education Character education as defined for this study. What is character education? In some ways this is a difficult question to answer, especially as it is usually...

QuickView

Display a larger image and more item information when the pointer pauses over a thumbnail
 

Layout options:

Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK
Select the collections to add or remove from your search
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
H
I
J
K
L
M
N
O
P
Q
R
S
T
U
V
W
X
Y
Z
 
OK