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  • All fields: 1988*
(450 results)



Display: 20

    • Page 66

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    • INTERPRETING WITH DEAF UNDER COMMON LAW TO 1880 61 gestural” (p. 36). Elyot is a rare and early example of described gestures that widen the fissure into forensic analysis and re-viewing. A close reading that transcends the legal particulars...
    • Page 175

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    • 165 References Kaplanidou, K. and Vogt, C. (2006, November). A Structural Analysis of Destination Travel Intentions as Function of Web Site Features. Journal of Travel Research, 45: 204-216. Retrieved September 12, 2009. Kline, R. B. (2005)....
    • Page 69

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    • INTERPRETING WITH DEAF UNDER COMMON LAW TO 1880 64 converse with him in that manner for seventeen years and upwards, and that he understood his meaning perfectly by those signs” (Cooke, 1742, p. 19). Before educational opportunities were available...
    • Page 13

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    • 7 more than 50 years ago. When racial segregation was ruled unconstitutional during the Brown versus the Board of Education in 1954, closing the gap in academic achievement between minorities and White students became a priority to educators and...
    • Page 35

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    • DECLARATIVE KNOWLEDGE AND ACCELERATION 33 reasonable to conclude that there is a significant relationship between knowledge and sprint speed when age and vertical jump are controlled. The effect size (Cohen, 1988) suggests that knowledge assessment...
    • Page 7

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    • Emotions in Conflict 2 (Filley, 1975; Hocker & Wilmot, 1991; Sillars, 1908a, 1980b; Witteman,1988). All of these settings involve unique perspectives and challenges. While conflict situations vary, one common denominator is the need to find...
    • Page 37

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    • DECLARATIVE KNOWLEDGE AND ACCELERATION 35 References Allard, F., Deakin, J., Parker, S., & Rodgers, W. (1993). Declarative knowledge in skilled motor performance: Byproduct or constituent? In J. L. Starkes & F. Allard (Eds.), Cognitive issues in...
    • Page 17

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    • 13 continue to show that one-fourth of grade school students do not read outside of school, and the majority read only for a few minutes daily (National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), 2007 as cited by Moats, 2009). “In a reanalysis of...
    • Page 11

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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 11 engage with artwork through a process of inquiry, they will find meaning (Dewey, 1934). This meaning will, in turn, provide them with insights about life and society, which can change their lives for the better...
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    • Emotions in Conflict 5 Chapter 2 Literature Review Interpersonal relationships are a fundamental part of the human experience. Throughout a typical day, it is common for an individual to have numerous interactions with other people. Each...
    • Page 14

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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 14 The student could feel pressure to judge all artwork in the classroom as high quality, despite his own personal taste or emotional response (Hamblen, 1987). Discipline Based Art Education. Over time, a new type of art...
    • Page 15

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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 15 unresolved conceptual issues continue to plague discussions of art criticism and hinder its implementation in the classroom” (2002, p. 84). He explained that because there are multiple ways to conduct art criticism,...
    • Page 223

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    • THE POTENTIALLY BRIGHT FUTURE OF RADIO 219 owners and companies who are real radio people. But the fact of the matter is, when you have that many radio stations, it becomes quite a big business. And you have to be aware of that bottom line, and...
    • Page 16

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    • INFLUENCING INTENTIONALITY 16 Over the last 30 years, many educators have followed the advice of Michael (1980), Kennedy, and Stinespring (1988) by favoring studio practices over art-viewing experiences in their curriculum. They spend most of their...
    • Page 16

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    • Emotions in Conflict 11 must be employed in order to make high-quality decisions that members fully commit themselves to applying. On the other hand a win-lose approach to negotiation is more comparable to the conflict management styles of...
    • Page 20

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    • Emotions in Conflict 15 connection to make an association. Ultimately, the research findings show that gender impacts conflict management tactics. Another situation impacting conflict management procedures and outcomes is experiences. Research has...
    • Page 87

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    • INTERPRETING WITH DEAF UNDER COMMON LAW TO 1880 82 not to invite a challenge from Garrow during cross-examination. Though not standard practice today, Neuman Solow (1988) recommended conveying dysfluent DPs in the third person, “so that the...
    • Page 22

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    • Emotions in Conflict 17 Additionally, a limitation is found in the under-developed emotional vocabularies (Bodtker & Jameson, 2001). Just as general communication is more typically conveyed nonverbally, so it is with emotions. Emotions have also...
    • Page 5

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    • Emotional Manipulation and Psychopathy 5 culpability for the behavior of the individuals. The blame has been entirely placed on the brain of the individual and it is asserted that it can be indeed fixed. Partially crossing the lines between deficit...

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