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    • 1927 166

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    • U^^^i^f^f^fl^^^ cMODEL SHOP | IT PAYS TO LOOK WELL We appreciate your patronage Come again HOWARD CHAMBERLAIN, Proprietor 7s the Place New Bank Phone 191 tttf&&fr&*&Sffffr&^^ n«&ftfcfap&fcfcfototofcfctofi^^ cNOW q)AYS HE artistic designs that are...
    • Page 283

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    • Jan. 5 , 1933.. .The City Manager discussed the report received from L . A . Wilson which handled the question. "Why Cedar City should refuse to renew the electric power franchise?" Jan. 12, 1933.. .William J. McConnell and Henry Houchen filed a...
    • Page 461

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    • Cedar City Culinary Water usage for 1960 and 24 y e a r s l a t e r , 1984 1960 Populatim Water Storage LGallonsl Water Connections Water Delivered LGallonsl Average Gal. per day per person LOW Day Usaqe Date (gall&sl High Day Usage Date (gallons)...
    • Page 477

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    • prove, however, that the manufacture of iron is an accomplished f a c t , and Iron County, with h e r vast coal fields and an inexhaustible amount of the best iron ore in the world, is destined in the near future to be a vast business center. I t...
    • Page 115

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    • GIRLS INTRAMURAL Nu Omega Rho (Basketball) Phi Alpha Beta (Volley Ball) Louise Anderson Horseshoe XI Lambda Tau (100% participation) Jean Macfarlane Tennis Louise Stuck! Checkers Rodney Palmer Lillian Shurtz Dancing 114
    • Page 50

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    • 44 Table 4 Which Family Members Read to You? Grandparent Brother Sister Aunt/Uncle Cousin Other High ELL 25% 13% 25% 13% 13% Low ELL 13% 13% 25% 38% In Table 5, the percentages of literacy activities in the home from the parents’ perspective are...
    • Page 51

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    • 45 Quantitative Data: Language and Literacy in the School All of the high ELLs preferred to speak only English with their peers at school. More than half of low ELLs preferred to speak both English and Spanish (see Table 6). The majority of low...
    • Page 52

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    • 46 column 2, the averages of parents visiting the public library was measured on a 4-point scale: never = 1, once per year = 2, once per month = 3, once per week = 4. Parents of high ELLs go to the family center more often and are 69% more likely...
    • Page 54

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    • 48 every day = 5. High ELLs used their computers to access digital literacies 23% more than low ELLs. It is important to note that both groups of ELLs took advantage of digital literacies in the HLE. More than half of both high and low ELLs who had...
    • Page 42

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    • STRAIGHT IS THE GATE 43 the findings of this study (Carbaugh, 2007). Although this study evaluates the Centennial Park community and communication through the lens of a critical theory, the results and conclusions of this study are only intended to...
    • Page 39

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    • 35 Figure 2. Daily Homework Assignments Table 2 Individual Student Improvement On Homework Assignments Over Three Units Of Math Instruction Daily Homework Assignments Student A Student B student C Student C Percentage improvement 41.0 62.0 45.0...
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    • Employee Giving 6 REFERENCES ................................................................................... 38 APPENDICES A. Are You 100% SUU Poster ................................................. 39 B. Drink Coupon...
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    • Employee Giving 10 money over to administrators to use how they see fit. Darla also provided me with confidence regarding the timing of our campaign. She pointed out that the only reason BYU does a fall campaign is that the United Way of Utah...
    • Page 12

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    • Employee Giving 13 employment at SUU. There would be no building to dedicate, no new program to launch and in most cases, no way of attributing a donation to a specific student. So participation – each employee donating something – became the...
    • Page 13

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    • Employee Giving 14 an organizational value of employee giving (Dainton & Zelley, 2005). The end result would then be a basic organizational assumption that employees at SUU donate financially to the University (Schockley-Zalabak, 2006). I also...
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    • Employee Giving 15 Some questioned the subtlety of the poster‟s message and the fact that it did not blatantly proclaim “employee giving.” However that was part of our goal. We wanted a conversation piece that would perk the curiosity of...
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    • Employee Giving 16 gave a benefit to each employee in exchange for his/her consideration of a donation (Appendix B). Publicity was also a component of the campaign, particularly as teams reached 100% participation. Congratulatory emails were sent...
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    • Employee Giving 22 “Employee giving is essential to the success of our comprehensive campaign. We gain important leverage in securing gifts if we can demonstrate to donors that SUU‟s own employees are doing what they can financially to advance...
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    • Employee Giving 25 the participation levels grow and I was extremely gratified to see colleagues going above and beyond my own expectations in their level of participation. I did significant follow through with my own team reminding them to...
    • Page 26

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    • Employee Giving 27 a faculty senate officer, on April 22, 2008, and learned that in fact they were legitimate donations and not dues. That meant for years, faculty senate donations were being processed incorrectly. Each donation was safe and used...

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