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Display: 20

    • Page 28

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    • 22 students’ investment in school learning appears to increase” (Haneda, 2006, p. 343). ELLs can then feel safe to learn in this type of school environment as it allows them become active readers and writers when exposed to new texts. It is not...
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    • 27 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this creative project is to determine what influence parents have on student success in math and what can be done as a teacher to rectify a lack of parental involvement in a child’s math education. Specific...
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    • 30 struggling students was successful or not. As required by Southern Utah University Department of Graduate Studies in Education, all necessary Institutional Review Board (IRB) requirements were met throughout the conduct of this creative...
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    • 32 Chapter 4 Results Throughout the researcher’s Master of Education Capstone project, five vital educational resources were monitored to effectively determine the ability and growth among students identified as lacking parental support. First,...
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    • 26 Chapter 3 Methodology The purpose of this research project was to determine individual teacher understanding of the RTI framework in place in their school, allow opportunity for teachers to share their insights of how RTI influences their...
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    • 60 One teacher stated that RTI did not impact advanced students. However, the researcher sees it in a different way, if all teachers’ energy and focus is put into moving struggling readers, making adaptations to instruction to help them be...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS self-esteem should rise. Thus, as a result of this project, parents and teachers should observe improved self-esteem in participants. Participants and Setting Those who were chiefly impacted by the study were two...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 45 called "expected" responses, they become more accepted by peers and their self-esteem rises. As self-esteem rises, an increase in classroom participation follows as does co-play with peers at break times. A rise in...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS vocabulary were the most helpful in the home environment. This vocabulary reminds students in an unthreatening manner to think about where they are and what they are doing, and what the social expectations of the...
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    • SOCIAL THINKING INTERVENTIONS 47 The Think Social! curriculum was the most natural and easiest to facilitate. This cognitive behavior therapy based curriculum turns abstract ideas, such as why making eye contact is important, into concrete...
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    • THE WEB 9 making that will help the companies they work for succeed. The Professional Writing and Communication course I took from Dr. Art Challis had obvious implications for writing the workbook. I was able to apply advanced research and writing...
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    • 16 Health & Human Development, 2000). In addition, ELLs who are literate in their first language must be explicitly taught the similarities and differences in the alphabets, letter sounds, and phonemes that are found in their native language and...
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    • 49 increased their scores dramatically. The key seems to be how to get parents to take the time to read. The SETHL did help the students who read, doubling the scores of the Spanish-English readers compared to the total non-readers. But the...
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    • U.S. Embassy 23 Similar to Dr. Challis’s course format, Dr. Heuett allows students to choose their own speech topic. Having the fortunate opportunity to attend speeches that have impacted and changed me, I was determined to set the bar for my...
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    • • Curriculum Change submissions at the University Level are accepted throughout the year. The committees meet regularly (bimonthly) during the first two months of the school year (September & October). Following that time both the Graduate and...
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    • When can Level 4 Program Changes be submitted? • All changes must go through their Department and College/School Curriculum Committee. Check with individual Departments and Colleges/Schools for submission deadlines. • Program Change submissions...
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    • Appendix H Section I: The Action Briefly describe the change. Include a listing of courses and credits as appropriate. Section II: Need Indicate why the change is justified. Reference need or demand data if appropriate. Section III: Institutional...
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    • Appendix I Section I: The Request Briefly describe the change. Indicate the primary activities impacted, especially focusing on any instructional activities. Section II: Need Indicate why such an administrative change, program, or center is...
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    • 34 Participants and Setting Those who were impacted by the creation of this project were elementary teachers and students at Eagle Elementary School. A specific emphasis was placed toward third-grade, fourth-grade, and fifth-grade teachers, as well...
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    • No pirates no princesses 50 Chapter 5: Discussion The purpose of the study is to understand the struggles mothers have and strategies mothers use in raising children with values and responsibility in a media saturated consumer culture using a...

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