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    • Chapter 2 Literature Review The purpose of this study was to examine iPads and their effect on writing in the secondary Language Arts classroom. This literature review looks at why schools may hold onto traditional methods of writing instead of...
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    • relevant information (Walsh & Simpson, 2013). Both traditional and digital processes support each other, and students return to what their teachers have taught. Students need to know how to navigate, read, take notes, evaluate, write, and search...
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    • more diverse audience. 78% agree that digital technologies encourage creativity. 79% agree that digital technologies encourage collaboration amongst students. These teachers view cell phones, social networks and texting as a way to aid student...
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    • individual idea generation, defining rules for document management, identifying roles for group members, communicating ideas, and managing conflict (Dillon, 1993). According to Heitin (2008) writing with paper and pencil is most often done by just...
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    • accessed by students wherever and whenever they have access to the internet (Lamb & Johnson, 2012). Audience and student motivation. “Studies have found that whenever students write for other actual, live people, they throw their back into the work...
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    • technology in literacy classrooms is more technological integration than curricular integration. (Hutchison, et al., 2012). This means that more teachers aren’t using technology daily to enhance students’ learning (Hutchison, et al., 2012). Heitin...
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    • Addressing teachers’ fear of technology and student success. “Two concerns that teachers have about using technology such as IM or blogs with their students is that students will not take the work seriously and will not use what they have learned...
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    • because what they are able to write will be legible to both them and their teacher and will be easier to edit as well. They read what I write Seventy-five percent of the students strongly agreed or agreed that what they wrote with the iPad was...
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    • handwrite, and why they do or do not feel they write better with their iPad. This could be due to lack of teacher training on how to implement iPads into the curriculum (Figure 6) or difficulty typing on a small computer. Social media New...
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    • 1 Chapter 1 Introduction – Nature of the Problem It is well known that students go through what is commonly referred to as “the fourth grade slump.” Research presented by Hall, Sabey, & McClellan (2005) and Fang (2008) has shown that this “slump”...
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    • 2 knowledge. Students are explicitly taught in the younger grades how to identify characters, setting, and plot. Students entering fourth grade are provided with textbooks in the areas of Social Studies and Science. They are asked to read the...
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    • 6 Chapter 2 Literature Review The National Center of Educational Statistics concluded that more than two thirds of students are not proficient readers (Biancarosa, 2005). This is a staggering statistic that leads one to question. How can teachers...
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    • 7 text structure, retelling, and summarizing as some of the main components that aid in the comprehension of expository text. Different strategies for each, as well as multiple strategies are examined in this literature review. Breakdown in...
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    • 8 readers need to be taught strategies, as well as how, where, and when to apply these strategies. The National Reading Panel identified the five elements of reading. The five elements include phonemic awareness, phonics, fluency, vocabulary, and...
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    • 9 require specific instruction that focuses on the specific skills needed to comprehend expository text (Fang, 2008). Teaching Comprehension Strategies In order to help students with learning disabilities comprehend expository text, it must be...
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    • 10 and apply comprehension strategies on their own during reading, therefore making the text more meaningful. Instruction in reading expository text must be planned and well thought out to promote student thought throughout the reading to result in...
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    • 11 Limited early exposure is a factor that can easily be remedied by all teachers. Children need to experience expository texts through seeing, hearing, reading, and writing, prior to when they are expected to comprehend the material within the...
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    • 17 of structure and organize it, they are better equipped to comprehend the information presented in the text (Moss, 2004) When presenting students with text passages, the passages should be selected with great care. The text needs to be well...
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    • 21 The Four-Part Lesson Cycle created by Montelongo et al. (2010) addressed vocabulary, text structure, modified sentence completion, and rewriting the text. This four-step cycle spanned a five-week period and showed a significant amount...
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    • 63 particular interest during the present time because the school district is in the process of switching to the new Common Core, which has a large emphasis on expository text. This study has shown that primary grade students with learning...

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